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Tag: conservation

Endangered ecosystems: Review on conservation status of Asian rivers

Physical, chemical or biological changes in the environment that will affect its equilibrium are indeed a need of thorough investigations. For it will create a compounded effect from the lower living organisms up to a higher one. This particular article cited the conservation strategies that sustain life on tropical Asian rivers way back two decades ago. River ecology is dominated by flow seasonality imposed by monsoonal rains with profound consequences for fishes and zoobenthos. Riverine biodiversity is threatened by habitat degradation, pollution, flow regulation, river regulation and control as well as over-harvesting. It is emphasized on this article the factors affecting ecological niche of the river based on the survey. At different level from biotic and abiotic features which is very important in determining the flora and fauna.

 

Threats to tropical Asian Rivers

Water elements and hydrochemistry in relation to its topography and latitude will constitute the wide range factor in ecological balance. Floodplain ecology is economically importance for the breeding and feeding sites of fishes and other aquatic organisms. Between the riparian forests indicates the lateral-interactions for carbon processing as well as trophic production. Two decades ago technologies are not yet fully develop compared today yet problems of river system existed way back time. Seasonal change in Asia will also affect the amount of water in the river catchment.

 

Mekong River is significantly important for potential energy that is why United Nation makes a committee to investigate. Irrigations, dams have been established all along the Mekong River to control the floods. Yet it cause an environmental impact and environmental consequences which affects balance patterns of nature and its species itself. Like for example the change in inundation patterns that affects productivity. Changes in flow and temperature may remove important directive factors for breeding and migratory behavior of some species.

 

Proper policy implementation and regulation in River system are very important it must foresee wide range effect to the environment. One single action will affect the whole system of the environment. Though this is still open for argument nowadays since politics and businesses will always contradict for maintaining the pristine ecosystem. Adequate management and efforts in assessing environmental impacts and collaborative studies is indeed necessary. Also a manifestation and proper policy for a good river ecosystem management are deemed needed. This is the challenge and continuing advocacy to limnologists to visualize and assess the sustainability and conservation of river ecosystem.

 

Source: Prepared by Joan Tura from Springer Hydrobiologia 

Volume 248, Issue 3 pp 167–191

Population trends, threats, and conservation of Waterbirds in China

Waterbirds are very important indicators in the ecosystem particularly wetlands. Due to climate change and human activities such as pollution, over-hunting and habitat loss about 23% globally are declining. Some have been listed as threatened species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) for about 19% worldwide. In view of this severe condition, waterbirds diversity has been rapidly decreasing and its conservation status received attention. In China there are 53.6 million hectares of wetlands making it the first among Asia and fourth in the world. There were different wetland types in China including swamps, rivers, lakes, coastal wetlands and estuaries. Conservation of waterbirds in China has been implemented establishing nature reserves, designating key habitat and captive breeding to increase population.

 

Population Trends of Waterbirds in China

According to Wetlands International there were 871 waterbird species in 32 families and 8 orders in the world. In China, 260 waterbird species has been identified that belongs to 21 families. 84 species exhibited a declining trend, 35 species remained stable while 16 species showed increasing trends. Threatened species includes Critically Endangered, Endangered, Vulnerable, Near Threatened, Least Concern and Data Deficient.  Moreover, the migratory and residents waterbirds suffered serious threats and a total of 38 species listed as threatened species. Also there were 6 species listed as Critically Endangered, 16 species Vulnerable, 16 species Endangered and 27 species as Near Threatened.

 

Threats to waterbirds include both direct and indirect human activities such as illegal hunting, disturbances, pollution and habitat loss. However, habitat loss is the most common threat because of large scale reclamation in both coastal and inland wetlands. According to the national surveys a decreased of 3.4 million hectares of wetlands wherein coastal losses more than inland wetlands. In recent years, continuous development and industrialization affects the natural habitats of waterbirds. In which foraging time have been reduced, vigilance behavior increased and recurrently being flushed away. As a consequence human disturbances forced the birds to abandon habitats and nest due to breeding failure.

 

Therefore, waterbirds in China might be in more serious situation than we thought that is why conservation must be implemented. Like restoration of degraded wetlands, public awareness, cracking down on illegal hunting and enforcement of Wildlife Protection Law. Additionally, restoration of highly threatened species through artificial intervention is needed. As well as promoting cooperation between international and regional information on conservation.

 

Source: Prepared by Joan Tura from Springer Nature BMC Avian Research

Published: 28 April 2018

 

Passionate about Thresher Sharks in the Philippines

My work as a marine biologist has drawn me to the Coral Triangle, an area of our oceans consisting of the highest levels of marine biodiversity. You can imagine that the abundance of marine life led to a high reliance of local populations on seafood. It is a cruel irony that some of the methods used to harvest this seafood destroy the very foundations of seafood supply. So when I decided to hop on the Conservation bandwagon, the Coral Triangle was an obvious choice. (more…)