Difference between revisions of "Transport"

From Biology-Online Dictionary | Biology-Online Dictionary
(updated)
(4 intermediate revisions by 3 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
Transport
+
'''Definition'''
  
(Science: radiobiology) refers to processes which cause heat energy, or particles, or something else, to flow out of the plasma and cease being confined. diffusion partly determines the rate of transport. energy losses from a plasma due to transport processes are a central problem in fusion energy research.
+
''noun''
  
See: classical transport, neoclassical transport, anomalous tranport, diffusion, ambipolar diffusion, bohm diffusion, classical diffusion, neoclassical diffusion, anomalous diffusion, energy transport, ripple transport.
+
(''biology'') The act or means of moving [[molecule]]s or [[ion]]s across ([[cell membrane]]) or through ([[bloodstream]])
Something that serves as a means of transportation.An exchange of molecules (and their kinetic energy and momentum) across the boundary between adjacent layers of a fluid or across cell membranes.The movement of a given structure from one location to another.
+
 
fuck u
+
(''general'') The movement (of something) from one place to another
 +
 
 +
 
 +
''verb''
 +
 
 +
To carry, move, or convey something from one location to another
 +
 
 +
 
 +
'''Supplement'''
 +
 
 +
In biology, [[transport]] refers to the act or the means by which a molecule or ion is moved across the [[cell membrane]] or via the [[bloodstream]]. There are two types of transport in this regard: (1) [[passive transport]] and (2) [[active transport]]. Passive transport is a kind of transport by which [[ion]]s or [[molecule]]s move along a [[concentration gradient]], which means movement from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration. Examples of passive transport include [[diffusion]], [[filtration]], and [[osmosis]]. [[Active transport]] is a  kind of transport wherein [[ion]]s or [[molecule]]s move against a [[concentration gradient]], which means movement in the [[direction]] opposite that of [[diffusion]] – or –movement from an area of lower [[concentration]] to an area of higher [[concentration]]. This type of [[transport]] requires expenditure of [[energy]] and the assistance of [[protein]]s (i.e. [[carrier protein]]).
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
''Word origin:'' Middle English, Old French ''transporter'' (carry or convey across), Latin ''transporto'', from ''trans''- (across) + ''porto'' (to carry)
 +
 
 +
''See also:''
 +
*[[ diffusion]]
 +
* [[osmosis]]
 +
''Related term(s):''
 +
* [[Ovum transport]]
 +
* [[Cholesterol ester transport proteins]]
 +
* [[Electron transport ]]
 +
* [[Active transport]]
 +
* [[Cotranslational transport ]]
 +
* [[Respiratory transport]]
 +
* [[Electron transport chain ]]
 +
* [[Axonal transport]]
 +
* [[Passive transport]]
 +
* [[Retrograde axonal transport]]
 +
* [[Membrane Transport Protein]]
 +
* [[Facilitated transport ]]
 +
* [[Coupled transport ]]
 +
* [[Transport antibiotic ]]
 +
''Mentioned in:''
 +
* [[Blood]]
 +
* [[Respiratory chain]]
 +
* [[Chemosmosis ]]
 +
* [[Nucleoporin]]
 +
* [[Porter]]
 +
* [[Electron carrier]]

Revision as of 23:40, 31 March 2015

Definition

noun

(biology) The act or means of moving molecules or ions across (cell membrane) or through (bloodstream)

(general) The movement (of something) from one place to another


verb

To carry, move, or convey something from one location to another


Supplement

In biology, transport refers to the act or the means by which a molecule or ion is moved across the cell membrane or via the bloodstream. There are two types of transport in this regard: (1) passive transport and (2) active transport. Passive transport is a kind of transport by which ions or molecules move along a concentration gradient, which means movement from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration. Examples of passive transport include diffusion, filtration, and osmosis. Active transport is a kind of transport wherein ions or molecules move against a concentration gradient, which means movement in the direction opposite that of diffusion – or –movement from an area of lower concentration to an area of higher concentration. This type of transport requires expenditure of energy and the assistance of proteins (i.e. carrier protein).


Word origin: Middle English, Old French transporter (carry or convey across), Latin transporto, from trans- (across) + porto (to carry)

See also:

Related term(s):

Mentioned in: