Difference between revisions of "Prostaglandin A"

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'''Definition'''
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'''Prostaglandin A''' (or PGA) is a vasodilating prostaglandin series. [[Prostaglandin]]s are [[eicosanoid]]s derived from unsaturated 20-carbon [[fatty acid]]s (e.g. [[arachidonic acid]]) through the cyclooxygenase pathway. PGA, in particular, is derived from the dehydration of the [[prostaglandin E]] series. In turn, PGA converts into prostaglandin B by a rearrangement in the double bond within its cyclopentane ring.
  
''noun, plural: prostaglandins A''
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PGA is a potent vasodilator, capable of dilating peripheral blood vessels and thereby lower arterial pressure.<sup>1</sup> It is also presumed as a natriuretic hormone. It may be acting as a circulating hormone that controls the reabsorption of sodium by the [[kidney]].<sup>2</sup>
  
A [[prostaglandin]] that is a strong [[vasodilator]] and derived from [[prostaglandin E]]; (13e,15s)-15-hydroxy-9-oxoprosta-10,13-dien-1-oic acid (pga(1)); (5z,13e,15s)-15-hydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,10,13-trien-1-oic acid (pga(2)); (5z,13e,15s,17z)-15-hydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,10,13,17-tetraen-1-oic acid (pga(3))
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Types of PGA are PGA<sub>1</sub> and PGA<sub>2</sub>. PGA1 (molecular formula: C<sub>20</sub>H<sub>32</sub>O<sub>4</sub>) is characterized by a cyclopentenone structure. It is first discovered in marine organisms, like corals. PGA2 (molecular formula: C<sub>20</sub>H<sub>30</sub>O<sub>4</sub>) is also produced by corals as self-defense mechanism. Both PGA1 and PGA2 occur naturally. In contrast, PGA analogs are not present in nature but are made artificially. They are referred to as synthetic PGAs. Abbreviation: PGA
  
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== See also ==
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* [[Prostaglandin]]
  
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==References ==
'''Supplement'''
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# Anderson, R. J., Berl, T., McDonald, K. M., & Schrier, R. W. (1976). Prostaglandins: Effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow, sodium and water excretion. Kidney International, 10(3), 205–215. https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.1976.99
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# Jones, R. L. (1972). Functions of prostaglandins. Pathobiol Annu. 2:359-80.
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# Prostaglandin A2 (CAS 13345-50-1). (2019). Retrieved from Caymanchem.com website: https://www.caymanchem.com/product/10210/prostaglandin-a2
  
[[Prostaglandin]] is an [[eicosanoid]] that is derived from unsaturated 20-carbon [[fatty acid]]s, such as [[arachidonic acid]], through the cyclooxygenase pathway. There are several prostaglandins and they are designated by appending a letter, i.e. from A to I, to indicate the type of substituents found on the [[hydrocarbon]] skeleton.
 
  
Prostaglandin A (PGA) series is a cyclopentenone [[prostaglandin]]. It is a potent vasodilator. It is thought to be a natriuretic hormone. It may be acting as a circulating hormone that controls the reabsorption of sodium by the [[kidney]].<sup>1</sup> PGAs are derived from the dehydration of the prostaglandin E series. The rearrangement of the double bond within the cyclopentane ring in PGA gives rise to the prostaglandin B series. PGA<sub>1</sub> and PGA<sub>2</sub> are examples of PGAs. They are found in many organs and tissues.
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© Biology Online. Content provided and moderated by '''[https://www.biology-online.org/about/ Biology Online Editors]'''
PGAs that are analogs or derivatives and do not occur naturally in the body are referred to as synthetic PGAs. They do not include the product of the chemical synthesis of hormonal PGAs.
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''Abbreviation/Acronym:''
 
* PGA
 
''See also:''
 
* [[prostaglandin]]
 
* [[prostaglandin E]]
 
* [[prostaglandin B]]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
''Reference(s):''
 
<br><sup>1</sup> Jones, R. L. (1972). Functions of prostaglandins. Pathobiol Annu. 2:359-80.
 

Latest revision as of 23:17, 13 October 2019

Prostaglandin A (or PGA) is a vasodilating prostaglandin series. Prostaglandins are eicosanoids derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids (e.g. arachidonic acid) through the cyclooxygenase pathway. PGA, in particular, is derived from the dehydration of the prostaglandin E series. In turn, PGA converts into prostaglandin B by a rearrangement in the double bond within its cyclopentane ring.

PGA is a potent vasodilator, capable of dilating peripheral blood vessels and thereby lower arterial pressure.1 It is also presumed as a natriuretic hormone. It may be acting as a circulating hormone that controls the reabsorption of sodium by the kidney.2

Types of PGA are PGA1 and PGA2. PGA1 (molecular formula: C20H32O4) is characterized by a cyclopentenone structure. It is first discovered in marine organisms, like corals. PGA2 (molecular formula: C20H30O4) is also produced by corals as self-defense mechanism. Both PGA1 and PGA2 occur naturally. In contrast, PGA analogs are not present in nature but are made artificially. They are referred to as synthetic PGAs. Abbreviation: PGA

See also

References

  1. Anderson, R. J., Berl, T., McDonald, K. M., & Schrier, R. W. (1976). Prostaglandins: Effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow, sodium and water excretion. Kidney International, 10(3), 205–215. https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.1976.99
  2. Jones, R. L. (1972). Functions of prostaglandins. Pathobiol Annu. 2:359-80.
  3. Prostaglandin A2 (CAS 13345-50-1). (2019). Retrieved from Caymanchem.com website: https://www.caymanchem.com/product/10210/prostaglandin-a2



© Biology Online. Content provided and moderated by Biology Online Editors