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Difference between revisions of "Chemical synapse"

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[[Chemical synapse]]
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'''Definition'''
  
(Science: physiology) a [[nerve]] [[nerve]] or [[nerve]] [[muscle]] [[junction]] where the [[signal]] is [[transmitted]] by [[release]] from one [[membrane]] of a [[chemical]] [[transmitter]] that [[binds]] to a [[receptor]] in the [[second]] [[membrane]]. Importantly, [[signals]] only [[pass]] in one direction.
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''noun, plural: chemical synapses''
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A specialized cell-to-cell junction where [[nerve impulse]] is transmitted in one direction, from one [[neuron]] to another or from a [[neuron]] to a non-neuronal cell.
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'''Supplement'''
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Through ''chemical synapse'', a [[neuron]] can connect and affect a [[target cell]], which can be another [[neuron]], or a non-neuronal cell such as muscle or gland cell. A [[neuromuscular junction]] for instance is a special [[synapse]] between a [[motor neuron]] and a [[muscle cell]]`. In this [[synapse]], the signal is passed along with the release of [[neurotransmitter]] by the [[motor neuron]] which leads to a cascade of physiologic reactions that ultimately cause the [[muscle cell]] to contract.
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Aside from chemical synapse, other types of biological synapses are [[electrical synapse]] and [[immunological synapse]].
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''See also:'' [[synapse]].

Latest revision as of 12:47, 24 February 2009

Definition

noun, plural: chemical synapses

A specialized cell-to-cell junction where nerve impulse is transmitted in one direction, from one neuron to another or from a neuron to a non-neuronal cell.


Supplement



Through chemical synapse, a neuron can connect and affect a target cell, which can be another neuron, or a non-neuronal cell such as muscle or gland cell. A neuromuscular junction for instance is a special synapse between a motor neuron and a muscle cell`. In this synapse, the signal is passed along with the release of neurotransmitter by the motor neuron which leads to a cascade of physiologic reactions that ultimately cause the muscle cell to contract.

Aside from chemical synapse, other types of biological synapses are electrical synapse and immunological synapse.


See also: synapse.