Confused and have questions? We’ve got answers. With Chegg Study, you can get step-by-step solutions to your questions from an expert in the field. If you rather get 1:1 study help, try 30 minutes of free online tutoring with Chegg Tutors.

Zoogeography

From Biology-Online Dictionary | Biology-Online Dictionary
(Redirected from Zoo geography)
Jump to: navigation, search

Definition

noun

A branch of biology that is primarily concerned about the geological distribution of animals


Supplement

Zoogeography is one of the various branches of biology. It deals primarily with the geological distribution of animals. It also studies the causes, effects, and interactions (in the past, the present, or the future) resulting in the geological distribution of particular species of animals. An expert in this filed is called a zoogeographer.

Zoogeography has two major divisions: (1) ecological zoogeography and (2) historical zoogeography. Ecological zoogeography attempts to understand and determine the role of the present biotic and abiotic interactions that affect the distribution of a particular group of animals. Historical zoogeography is concerned with determining and understanding the origin, extinction, and dispersal of a particular taxon. It aims to understand the past distribution of animals that led to their present day pattern. Thus, it encompasses and makes use of geography, geological history, evolutionary theories, physiography, climate, etc. in their study.

Based on the proposal of Philip Sclater and Alfred Wallace, there are six main zoogeographic regions of the world. These are as follows:

  • Nearctic region
  • Palaearctic region
  • Neotropical region
  • Ethiopian region
  • Oriental region
  • Australian regions


Variant(s):

  • zoo geography

See also:

Related form(s):

  • zoogeographical (adjective)