Stratum lucidum

From Biology-Online Dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Definition

noun

The thin, clear layer of the epidermis comprised of keratinocytes filled with eleidin proteins, and occurs in the palms (palmar skin) and the soles (plantar skin)


Supplement

In animals, such as vertebrates, the epidermis is made up of four or five layers (each called stratum). These layers protect the underneath layers of the skin against physical damage, infection, and water loss. In humans, the epidermis consists of the following layers: (1) stratum corneum, (2) stratum lucidum, (3) stratum granulosum, (4) stratum spinosum, and (5) stratum basale or germinativum).

The stratum lucidum is a Latin term, which literally means clear layer. The name is derived from its translucence when viewed under a microscope. This layer is found particularly in the palmar and plantar skin. The presence of the stratum lucidum makes the palmar and plantar skin characteristically thick. The skin in other body parts lacks stratum lucidum. Its presence indicates the importance of having thicker skin to protect against frequent exposure to mechanical stress.

The stratum lucidum is found in in between the stratum corneum and the stratum granulosum. The keratinocytes are filled with eleidin (a protein that may be later converted to keratin).


Synonym(s):

  • clear layer of the epidermis

See also: