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Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

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Definition

Noun

A gram-negative motile and non-fermentative obligate anaerobe bacterium involved in nosocomial infections in humans.

Supplement

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is isolated from environmental sources and water that grows at temperature ranging from 5’C-40’C. It also found in man-made environments and able to survive in chlorinated water that usually evades normal host defenses to cause infections. It has positively charge surfaces consisting flagella and fimbrial adhesion forming a biofilm.

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia human infection is resulted from the acquisition of environmental organisms that leads to or hospital water system. It contains outer membrane lipopolysaccharide that has a significant role in colonization and resistance to cell killing and lipid A that stimulate peripheral blood monocytes and alveolar macrophages which is important in pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia human infection is resulted from the acquisition of environmental organisms that leads to soft tissue infections in which developed countries recognized infections as nosocomial from contamination of medical equipment or hospital water system. It is extremely virulent yet various factors promote ability to colonize the respiratory tract as well as plastic surfaces including endotracheal tubes and catheters where endemic occurs in various hospitals revealing multiple distinct genetic strains.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom: Bacteria

Phylum: Proteobacteria

Class: Gammaproteobacteria

Order: Xanthomonadales

Family: Xanthomonadaceae

Genus: Stenotrophomonas

Species: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

See also:

• Bacteria

• Nosocomial infection