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Saturated fatty acid

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Definition

noun, plural: saturated fatty acids

A form of fatty acid with only single bonds between carbon atoms


Supplement

A fatty acid is a long chain of hydrocarbon. If there are no unsaturated linkages but only single bonds between carbon atoms them the fatty acid is a saturated type. This is in contrast to an unsaturated fatty acid that contains at least one double carbon-carbon bond.

A saturated fatty acid is a type of fatty acid that lacks unsaturated linkages between carbon atoms. Because of the lack of double bonds, this type of fatty acid can no longer absorb any more hydrogen; it is saturated. Saturated fatty acids are commonly found in animal fats. They include the 12-carbon containing fatty acid, lauric acid, the 14-carbon myristic acid, the 16-carbon palmitic acid, the 18-carbon stearic acid, the 20-carbon arachidic acid, the 22-carbon behenic acid, the 24-carbon lignoceric acid, and the 26-carbon cerotic acid.

In humans, the recommended consumption is not more than 10% of the total calories per day. Too much consumption of saturated fat is associated with heart diseases and atherosclerosis. The saturated fats increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Some of the dietary sources of saturated fats are butter, coconut oil, meat, peanut, butter, and cheese.


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