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Sag

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sag

1. To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane; as, a line or cable supported by its ends sags, though tightly drawn; the floor of a room sags; hence, to lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position; as, a building may sag one way or another; a door sags on its hinges.

2. To lose firmness or elasticity; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced. the mind I sway by, and the heart I bear, Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear. (Shak)

3. To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily. To sag to leeward, to make much leeway by reason of the wind, sea, or current; to drift to leeward; said of a vessel.

Origin: Akin to Sw. Sacka to settle, sink down, LG.sacken, D. Zakken. Cf. Sink.