Confused and have questions? We’ve got answers. With Chegg Study, you can get step-by-step solutions to your questions from an expert in the field. If you rather get 1:1 study help, try 30 minutes of free online tutoring with Chegg Tutors.

Hardy-Weinberg principle

From Biology-Online Dictionary | Biology-Online Dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Definition

noun

A principle stating that both allele and genotype frequencies in a randomly-mating population remain constant – and remain in this equilibrium across generations -- unless a disturbing influence is introduced.


Supplement

For instance, a population containing the genotypes AA, aa and Aa, the frequency of AA will always be p2, aa will be q2, and Aa will be 2pq at equilibrium, where the p is the frequency of A and q is the frequency of a.

Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg principle indicates evolution of species. Examples of disturbing influences include non-random mating, mutations, selection, limited population size, random genetic drift and gene flow.


Word origin: named after G. H. Hardy and Wilhelm Weinberg.

Abbreviation: HWP
Variants: