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Dense regular connective tissue

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Definition

noun

A form of dense connective tissue characterized by extracellular fibers (in particular, collagen fibers) arranged in parallel bundles


Supplement

The dense connective tissue is a type of connective tissue proper that consists predominantly of fibers, especially type I collagen. The fibroblasts in the matrix generate these fibers. As the name implies, this type of connective tissue proper is dense or closely compacted in contrast to the other type, which is the loose connective tissue. Two forms of dense connective tissues include the (1) dense regular connective tissue and (2) dense irregular connective tissue.

In dense regular connective tissue, the collagen fibers are arranged in parallel bundles. It makes it suitable for binding body parts together. It has great tensile strength resisting pulling forces particularly from a single direction. In particular, tendons and ligaments are examples of dense regular connective tissue. Tendons connect muscles to bones whereas ligaments connect a bone to another bone. Other examples include the perichondrium around the tracheal cartilage and the tunica albuginea around the testis.

The dense regular connective tissue occurs in two forms, i.e. white or yellow fibrous connective tissue.


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