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Clinical neuroscience

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Definition

noun

A branch of neuroscience that deals with the scientific study of the mechanisms underlying the different disorders and pathologies of the nervous system


Supplement

Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system and is concerned with the structure, development, function, chemistry, pharmacology, and pathology of the nervous system. Modern tools and technologies (e.g. molecular biology, electrophysiology, computational methods, etc.) led to the advancement of research on nervous system. As a result, neuroscience is now comprised of various branches.

Clinical neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience that is concerned with the fundamental mechanisms underlying disorders and pathologies of the nervous system. Thus, it touches related fields such as neurology and psychology. Neurology is the branch of medicine that deals with the nervous system, specially associated with disorders, diagnosis, and treatment. Psychology is the study of mind and behavior of humans and animals. Clinical neuroscience research seeks to find ways of identifying, diagnosing, and preventing disorders of the brain, for instance. It also would want to come up with novel treatments for these disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, brain tumours, depression, Down syndrome, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, sleep disorders, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, Tourette syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, epilepsy, etc.


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