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Belding Scribner

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Bio

(1921-2003) An American nephrologist who formed the basis of Scribner shunt, which is a device to be installed permanently in the patient's arm receiving a long-term kidney dialysis


Supplement

Belding Hibbard Scribner, better known as Scrib, was a nephrologist and known for his works, Scribner shunt. He graduated from the University of California in Berkeley in 1941 and then a medical degree in Stanford Medical School in San Francisco in 1947. There he was mentored by Thomas Addis who was the developer of Addis counts and the urea ratio and a leader in the study of glomerulonephritis. In 1947, Scrib became a fellow at the Mayo Foundation. In 1950, he attended the lecture of John Merril on the Kolff rotating drum artificial kidney and thought of it as a possible treatment for acute renal failure.1 In 1958, he became the head of the Division of Nephrology at the University of Washington. He served as the head of the division until 1982. There, he won an award (2002 Albert Lasker Award for clinical research) for his 1960 design of the Scribner Shunt, which is a device that could be installed permanently in the arm of a patient, enabling a long-term kidney dialysis. After his retirement in 1990, he founded the Seattle's Swedish Hospital's Seattle Artificial Center, which is the first community dialysis unit.2


See also:

Reference(s):
1 Blagg, C. R. (2010). Belding Hibbard Scribner—Better Known as Scrib. CJASN5 (12): 2146-2149.
2 Froehling, J. (n. d.). Extra: Belding Scribner. Washington.edu. Retrieved from [1].