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mercuryy
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Post by mercuryy » Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:30 pm

what's the difference between co-factor and co-enzyme. ? is co-enzyme a form of co-factor?

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Dustfinger
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Post by Dustfinger » Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:20 am

I'd say a co-factor is a form of co-enzyme....
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Post by victor » Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:41 am

cofactor is divided into 2 group, organic and inorganic. Organic cofactor is mentioned by biochemists as co-enzyme, example, vitamin.
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Post by Dustfinger » Fri Dec 01, 2006 11:19 am

Yes, that's it.....now my memory has returned... :lol:
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Tan Tze Chein
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Post by Tan Tze Chein » Sat Jan 13, 2007 11:55 am

Cofactor can be divided into 3 groups: activators, coenzymes and phosthetic group. Coenzymes is an organic substances that derived from vitamin B complex. Coenzymes use to speed up the rate of reaction catalysed by enzymes. Based on my knownledges, there are two types of coenzymes which is NAD(Nicotimide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD(Flavein Adenine Dinucleotide).

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Post by MrMistery » Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:03 pm

coenzyme is any form of organic cofactor. it can be NAD, FAD or anything else. Most vitamins act as coenzymes, not only those in the B complex.
No idea what an activator is.
Phosthetic? Maybe you mean prostetic? A prostetic group is defined as a cofactor very tightly or even covalently bond cofactor.
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Post by Tan Tze Chein » Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:18 pm

Activators is an inorganic substances that bind temporary to the allosteric sites of the enzymes and enable it to function more effeciently. Prosthetic group can referred to be heme that bind permanently to the haemoglobin and let the haemoglobin to function effeciently in carrying oxygen ang carbon dioxides.

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Post by MrMistery » Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:20 pm

oh you were reffering to allosteric regulators-activators.. Now i got it..
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Post by sachin » Sat Jan 13, 2007 4:27 pm

Most of the time activators are called co-factors.....
which starts any process by activating enzyme...

NAD and FAD..... I m bit confused but I dont take them as enzymes or co-enzymes any how...
since they directly take part in reactions to get reduce to form organic compounds.....
May be thats why thry are called co-enzymes :?
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Post by victor » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:38 am

sachin_at_biog wrote:NAD and FAD..... I m bit confused but I dont take them as enzymes or co-enzymes any how...
since they directly take part in reactions to get reduce to form organic compounds.....
May be thats why thry are called co-enzymes :?


Hmm...according to me, the reduced and oxidized forms of both NAD and FAD is just a transition state for these 2 mlecules, while the biochemists termes them as a part which are crucial for the enzyme function. So, that's why they're termed as the co-enzymes.
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