mutations

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Post Reply
User avatar
fluktuacia
Death Adder
Death Adder
Posts: 75
Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:57 pm

mutations

Post by fluktuacia » Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:24 am

Why are som genetic or chromosomal mutations more common than the others, e.g the trisomy of 21 or 13, 18 are more usual than trisomy of 1 (in fact i've never heard about it:). May the reason be, that some mutations are so highly fatal, that they prevent any development of embryo (even the earliest stages). And when the embryo is not developed at all (we even don't notice that the woman is pregnant, nay that the embryo has some genetic disorder) we think that those mutations do not occure (even if they occurance may be the same as of those mutations which enable baby to develop, be born and survive for some time (or longer))

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Fri Oct 13, 2006 10:04 am

i don't think they all have the same occurency, since, if you ask me, some events are more common than others. i donno why this is, or even if it is known why this is. but you are absolutely correct that only the Down, Eduards and Patau syndromes are noted in gnetics books as autosomal trisomies because only embryos with these trisomies develop. if an egg cell has trisomy one, it will deffinetly die in early stages of development, but it does exist - i mean, it is possibl to happen...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests