fermentation

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m1022
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fermentation

Post by m1022 » Thu Oct 12, 2006 2:24 am

Does anyone know if fermentation or cell respiration produce more ATP per molecule of glucose? I know that glycolysis produces 2 molecules of ATP, 2 molecules of pyruvic acid and 2 molecules of NADH and that the yeast can survive with only 2 molecules of ATP/glucose, but how do I figure out which produce more ATP per molecule of glucose? Or do I have the answer right in front of me and just can't figure it out???

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fluktuacia
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Post by fluktuacia » Thu Oct 12, 2006 1:42 pm

i don't know if I understand you:). Yes, the glycolysis produces 2ATP,2NADH and 2pyruvates, but it's just the first part of cellular respiration. During the later stages (Kreb's cycle and mostly oxidative phosphorylation) more ATPs are created (together 36 per molecule of glucose). Fermentation produces just 2ATP (4 during glycolysis but 2 are used up).. Glycolysis is producing 4ATP in both fermentation and cell. respiration, but the further processes influence the total ATP production.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:42 pm

yeah, the answer was staring you in the face.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

BioCell
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Post by BioCell » Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:29 pm

Just adding.
In fermentation, exg in muscles during exercise, the formed pyruvate from broken down glucose will be used to produce lactic acid because there's also NAD+ as a result product. This NAD+ is then going to be used again in glycolysis to produce ATP again.

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