cell cultures - using tumor cells

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Arthur
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cell cultures - using tumor cells

Post by Arthur » Sat Aug 19, 2006 4:33 pm

Hi everybody!

I was reading a book, now have some question about the use of cell lines. i was looking at google for answer, but didnt find straight data of my quest. Some more information would be great.

First question, why do researchers use most of time tumor cells for any testing with cell cultures? Is it because of their longevity (pass through their limit, about 50 divisions, like primary cultures? Or is it just because this cells have a higher potential to stay alive through the tests/substances because of their transformation (deactivated senescence)?

Or is it the speed of results that make mutant cells attractiv for researchers? Do they prefer them because of its proliferation rate?

Another book tells the proliferation rate of tumor cells in vitro is much more higher (appending to the tumor grades) than in vivo. Such higher that the proliferation speed can go out of control. Well, are their proliferation in vitro really higher than the proliferation rate of non cancer cells in vitro? Or are they almost the same (until they do not have any contact to neighbour cells)?

Thanks for any help :)

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canalon
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Post by canalon » Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:53 pm

As far as I know, the first hypothesis is the good one.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)

Arthur
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Post by Arthur » Sat Aug 19, 2006 10:17 pm

Hi Canalon,

thank you!

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Aug 20, 2006 9:28 am

I have no idea, but just going on my logical thinking, i would agree with Patrick.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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Post by Priscilla » Mon Aug 21, 2006 11:31 pm

Of course researchers want to have quick answers but as far as I know, quality is the biggest concern in research. So time in proliferation shouldn't be the case. As for longevity, if it's harder for them to die, then experiments would not be accurate(get my point?). coz the results can't apply to normal cells in human in general.

However, I don't know the rate of proliferation in normal cells as compare to that of cancer cell. Personally, I didn't have same type of cells, one normal and one cancerous to compare with. But different cancer cells have different growth rate. The same is true for normal.

I think you had misinterpret the word "out of control". they said cancer cells can grow out of control. what they mean is in vivo, tumor cells divide uncontrollably. But as a researcher, most things can be controlled!!!! If they grow faster, it takes us less time to finish the experiment; more time for slower growing cells. (the hint is like filling up a tub with water. if the tap runs faster....compare to a tap running slower. Can you control the tap and can you control the volume in the tub??!!!)
Cheers

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