Genetic constants in HIV replication/mutation

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biomass62583
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Genetic constants in HIV replication/mutation

Post by biomass62583 » Thu Jul 27, 2006 6:58 pm

Due to the increased ability of HIV to mutate under medication induced stimuli, I am looking for a marker, that remains constant through the process of mutation in order to hypothetically target that marker in the efforts to fight the infection more efficently. I have found a few RNA chains that stay constant, but I am more interesting in finding the ones that code for reverse transcriptase enzymes and deleting them from the chain discourage replication at such a rapid rate. Any ideas? (FYI this is more for your thoughts rather than giving me web pages, and resources, I have done and am doing my research continously, just looking for opinions, and creative ideas ) :)

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Thu Jul 27, 2006 7:02 pm

i donno if that is such a good idea vsince some transposons in our own DNA also code for the enzyme reverstranscriptase and your vaccine might result in something resembling an autoimmune desease.

But you just ask the british, they said they are in final stages of developing an HIV1 vaccine..
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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victor
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Post by victor » Fri Jul 28, 2006 2:05 am

Yup, like Andrew said...it wasn't effective...I think you've to aim for HIV antireceptor which are CXCR4 (for macrophage trophic HIV) and CCR5 (for lymphocyte trophic HIV)...I hope I wrote it correct...

I've read in the book and it said that one which have a mutation occurs on CXCR4 in macrophage is immune to HIV-1...
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sat Jul 29, 2006 7:58 pm

i read that in campbell too..
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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