speciation

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chicken_boy
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speciation

Post by chicken_boy » Tue Jul 25, 2006 7:16 am

Just wondering. Is there a set level of genetic variation between two close species, wherein they can no longer interbreed and produce fertile offspring? Perhaps a certain percentage of their genetic code? Does a higher gene count allow for more variation, before true speciation occurs?

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Wed Jul 26, 2006 6:58 pm

No, there is no standard difference between 2 individuals where they are considered 2 species. It depends from case to case. some species may be even considered 2 species if the postzygotic barriers prevent them from interbreeding. Like 2 birds may be able to interbreed physiologically, but the fact that one of them breeds in winter and the other in summer makes them 2 different species.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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