Evolution tests with bacteria

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Post Reply
User avatar
chicken_boy
Garter
Garter
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Jul 23, 2006 6:05 am
Location: Australia

Evolution tests with bacteria

Post by chicken_boy » Tue Jul 25, 2006 4:13 am

Because Bacteria evolve far faster than humans, bacteria would be ideal for testing evolution. If you isolate one bacteria population from another after a while they should evolve into different species, right?

Actually, I have heard this test has already been carried out but is this true?

If so, how far has the isolated bacteria evolved? Have they evolved into different species and maybe even into different families of bacteria? Who knows, maybe even a different order or class?

If this hasn't been tested, why hasn't it? This is the best way to prove evolution beyond the species, genus, family, order, class ect. barrier because bacteria evolve far faster than we do. This will definitely shut the creationists and anti-evolutionists up.

User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada

Post by canalon » Tue Jul 25, 2006 12:56 pm

Ma ke a litteratur search on the work of Richard Lenski. He did the experiment you relate. Last time I read the populations where still not far enough to be considered as different species. But the concept of species in bacteria is not exactly the clearest one... So maybe they already obtained a new species. But I fear the anti-evolutionist won't believe that. They will ask at least for the bacteria to change into a fully grown chimp or a woolly mammoth to accept that micro-evolution and macro-evolution (as they say) are indeed the same thing.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)

User avatar
mkwaje
Coral
Coral
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 2:48 am
Location: Philippines

Post by mkwaje » Sun Jul 30, 2006 9:03 am

Interesting... since evolution may involve the application of a certain biotic or abiotic factors; then an experiment inducing the bacteria to become penicillin resistant, for example would lead to a generation of pen resistant bacteria. Is this classified as evolution? Change of traits? For human, for example, you become highly tolerant to extreme radiation, is it not a form of evolution. Bacteria can be induced to become radiation resistant by simply applying increasing radiation to a culture and cultivating the survivors.

User avatar
Sepals
Coral
Coral
Posts: 364
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Manchester

Re: Evolution tests with bacteria

Post by Sepals » Sun Aug 13, 2006 5:08 pm

chicken_boy wrote:Because Bacteria evolve far faster than humans, bacteria would be ideal for testing evolution. If you isolate one bacteria population from another after a while they should evolve into different species, right?

Actually, I have heard this test has already been carried out but is this true?

If so, how far has the isolated bacteria evolved? Have they evolved into different species and maybe even into different families of bacteria? Who knows, maybe even a different order or class?

If this hasn't been tested, why hasn't it? This is the best way to prove evolution beyond the species, genus, family, order, class ect. barrier because bacteria evolve far faster than we do. This will definitely shut the creationists and anti-evolutionists up.
Nothing will shut them up. They're not interested in evidence.

Mutations happen spontaneously and as bacteria divide much sooner than animals reproduce any mutations that happens will show up sooner but I find in my job growing them on selective media makes the process quicker. I grow them on evans phosphate, nitrogen or carbon limited, which genetrates auxotrophs (phenotypes which only show up under certain conditions). Many similar experiments have been undertaken, these are available on google scholar. The mutations/strains will still be classed by the same taxonomy system as everything else.
Image

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest