Can someone put this into english for me??

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TheDude74
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Can someone put this into english for me??

Post by TheDude74 » Sat Jul 15, 2006 8:35 pm

The question is:

since the relative concentration of the water in the pond in which a paramecium (a single celled organism) lives is greater than the concentration of water in its cytoplasm, water molecules constantly move from the pond into the paramecium. The best long term solution to the problem of maintaining a stable internal environment is for the paramecium to 1)change the water to caron dioxide and excrete it, 2)store the water molecules, 3)incorporate the water molecules into its structure, 4)actively transport water molecules out of its cell.

im not asking for the answer, since i know i cant do that, but i dont understand the question at all

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LilKim
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Post by LilKim » Sun Jul 16, 2006 12:04 am

The question starts off by saying that there is a higher concentration of water molecules in pond water that in the cytoplasm of a paramecium (swimming in the pond).

Because water always moves down a concentration gradient it would be safe to assume that the water molecules move from the pond (where the molecular concentration is high) into the paramecium's "body" (where the water molecule concentration is lower). HOWEVER, if this process wasn't "regulated" we would expect that the poor paramecuim would EXPLODE because of water ... constanly rushing in.. and having no where to go.

Fortunately, the paramecium doesn't explode; therefore, it clearly has a cellular process that helps to "regulate" the amount of water present in it's 'body' .... therefore, which process/thing provides "the best long term solution to the problem of maintaining a stable internal environment for the paramecium?"

1)change the water to caron dioxide and excrete it,
2)store the water molecules,
3)incorporate the water molecules into its structure,
4)actively transport water molecules out of its cell.

Please let me know if you'd like me to re-phrase it again ... or help you find the answer!

buena suerte!
- KIM

TheDude74
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Post by TheDude74 » Sun Jul 16, 2006 9:45 pm

i said it was number 1...was i right?

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LilKim
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Post by LilKim » Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:00 pm

Sorry 1 isn't the correct answer.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is composed of 1 carbon atoms and 2 oxygen atom.

Wherase water (H2O) is composed of 2 hydrogen and 1 oxygen atoms.

So, if CO2 were to be converted to H2O ... you'd need 2 water molecules to get rid of 2 of the oxygen molecules.. leaving a 2 hydrogen atoms (AND the cell would have to find a Carbon atom to make the C of the CO2)

This way wouldn't be an effiecient way of getting rid of water because:

1. alot of energy is required to break bonds and re-form new molecules.

2. the production of Hydrogen ions (the by-product of breaking down water to form CO2) would itself kill the cell.

Guess again .. my friend!

- Kim

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Post by biomass62583 » Wed Jul 26, 2006 5:27 pm

paramecium store and move water molecules out of the cell continously to maintain osomolarity. This is the most logical answer, since storing the h20 will cause the cell to lysis, and incorporating h20 into its structure would be a difficult taks, and making changing h2o to co2 is to much work for a simple organism to do and still survive, the question is refering to a solution the is most plausable and works in the realm of evolution/adaptation the paramecium has additional structures used for moveing water out of cell, this structure is the most benificial long term solution. since less engery is used in comparison to the three other possibilities

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