Enzymes: Vitamin C vs. Temperature and pH

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Jelanen
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Post by Jelanen » Sun Jun 19, 2005 2:02 am

Yes, boiling could increase the oxidation rate since the kinetics of a reaction can be influenced by heat. I understand there is some controversy on the matter of how much heat degrades L-ascorbate, but I'm not gonna get into it cause I really don't care.

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novacasanova
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lemon juice

Post by novacasanova » Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:20 am

Does the ordinarily acidic lemon juice become alkaline in humans after ingestion like the lemons themselves do? Why(not)?

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mith
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Post by mith » Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:57 am

no, because if you read the previous posts you'll see that it isn't alkaline.
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Post by novacasanova » Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:56 am

Sorry for going off topic here...

If a food's potassium, sodium, or calcium content is higher than its phosphate, chloride or sulpher content then it's considered alkaline producing when ingested. That's why lemons are alkaline producing.

Why wouldn't juice derived directly from lemons likewise be alkaline producing? Are the alkaline producing contents of lemons within the skin?

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Post by novacasanova » Tue Aug 02, 2005 6:08 am

MrMistery wrote:i don't think vitamin C can be oxidised, because it is an antioxidant. At high temperatures(i.e.- when you cook it) the cells burst and most of the vitamin C evaporates


Vitamin C has to be oxidized before it crosses the blood brain barrier via glucose transporters.

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mith
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Post by mith » Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:13 pm

I'm sorry I haven't heard of that rule before, where did you read it from?
I think that rule doesn't work very well since it would seem to ignore organic acids such as acetic acid which is composed of C,H, and O none of which are mentioned.
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Post by sashell4817 » Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:51 pm

it has been suggeted that the sourness of citrus fruits is dependent on its citrus acid content,which experiment can i use to justify or refute this claim?
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Post by barrybert » Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:02 am

Who said that lemon is Alkaline? If lemon is alkaline, I wouldn't drink the juice because it must be very bitter..he2...as you said that lemon has pH from 2 - 2.5 and the substances that is contained in the lemon are vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)...but, you said that even though it's acid but inside human body it will become alkalic...um, how about the theory of the buffer liquid that our body have? Actually it's not making it more alcalic but the buffer liquid of the body maintain the acid stage inside that.
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