Relaxation Fauna

Discussion of the distribution and abundance of living organisms and how these properties are affected by interactions between the organisms and their environment

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sarahsarahsarah
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Relaxation Fauna

Post by sarahsarahsarah » Thu May 11, 2006 9:08 am

Hi there,

i have another confusing ( well to me anyway!) question that i would love some advice on. Im just having a bit of trouble properly understanding the concepts.

What are relaxation fauna and why dont we find them on oceanic islands?

thanks so much!
Sarah

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AstusAleator
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Post by AstusAleator » Mon May 15, 2006 1:59 am

???


species relaxation occurs after then environment changes, becoming less hospitable for (lowering the fitness of) a species. Or it can also happen after a population has boomed to a size larger than the environment can sustain.

You probably could find it on oceanic islands in cases where man moves in and cuts down forests, etc...

It's been clearly demonstrated to be a part of island biogeographic theory in tests done on parsels of rainforest seperated from the rest of the forest.

SJ
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WAKE UP, we all recognise those questions!!!

Post by SJ » Mon May 15, 2006 11:20 am

Dude why can't u just learn to do the work urself! I'll give u the answer for ur next assignments tho, go to class and listen, don't be a talker or failing that listen to the lecture recordings, thats what I do and I understand the answers!! I hope u get found out!

Biol1003
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Post by Biol1003 » Mon May 15, 2006 1:13 pm

Once you have finished your degree, do you also plan on stealing a nobel prize?


For a more accurate answer try this:

Relaxation fauna are animals that got sick of working for a living so they moved to tropical islands where they can relax. Problem was the other animals caught them bludging, got angry and smoked em with methyl bromide 1970s style. Thats also why you dont find relaxation fauna on oceanic islands.


LOL

thanks astus :)

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Another question

Post by howdyman » Mon May 15, 2006 2:52 pm

Hi there,

I also have a confusing question that I would love some advice on. I'm also having a bit of trouble properly understanding the concepts.

Why would a cane toad make a good pet? What would the feeding regime be, and which activities should you provide for the toad?

thanks so much guys! Really appreciated!

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Post by AstusAleator » Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:18 am

A cane toad would be a horrible pet! They have destroyed the Hawaiian ecosystem and are destroying the Australian ecosystem. If you life in some place that doesn't have cane toads, the last thing you'd want to do is have a cane toad as a pet, as it would most likely escape and start wreaking havoc on the countryside.
Cane toads have a potent toxin in their skin. They have no natural predators, since anything that eats them dies. They were introduced to Australia in order to eat the insects infesting the sugar cane fields, but they quickly escaped the fields and began spreading.
They eat bugs and small amphibians. They're nearly decimated the local populations of frogs and salamandar because they eat their eggs and young, as well as competing for the same food.
Predators such as foxes, cats, and raptor birds are also dying being decimated because they are eating the toads. If a predator takes a bite out of a toad it's dead. There is no opportunity for it to survive and learn to not eat the toads, thus keeping alive a population that knows not to eat them.
If you really wanted to keep a cane toad as a pet, you should feed it bugs. Excersises??? I dunno. Make a little sugar cane plantation in your backyard and fence it up. Whatev. They're EVIL. PURE EVIL. never own a cane toad.
What did the parasitic Candiru fish say when it finally found a host? - - "Urethra!!"

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Post by vk4vfx » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:32 pm

Why would you wanna own a Cane toad as a pet??? Where I live in Queensland they have done irreparable damage to the ecology.

They were introduced in 1935 to control the cane beetle that was attacking the sugar cane crops the thing is the majority of the beetles were found higher up the stick of cane and the cane toad being non arboreal fed on the minority of beetles on the ground this had little to no affect on the population (shows you how much research went into it)

They compete fiercely with our native frogs (Australia has no native toads) for habitat/food and outbreed our natives 5:1 feasting on the eggs/tadpoles/froglets and even the adults there are only 2 species of snake here that can eat them and survive as they are highly toxic producing "Bufotoxin" they have spread far and wide.

Their skins can be dried and smoked causing an hallucinogenic effect and cane toad skins here in Australia are actually on the controlled substances list in some states, part of the "Bufotoxin" is actually used for predicting human pregnancy why the hell anyone would wanna own one of these disgusting pests is beyond me I kill everyone of them I see!

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Post by Gano » Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:55 am

probably easier to get a non-australian to understand why one would want to own a cain toad. perhaps its because they are an amazing animals with soem amazing qualities. yes it breeds like wildfire, but they need a male and female pair. one would have to be fairly retarded to have on eescape captivity...

for the record the toxin comes out of 2 bumps on their "neck" on the back. definatly a harmfull drug!

although i agree they are a BIG pest and should not be in OZ, it was humans that brought it here. we cannot blame them for doing what they do, breed. after all, humans were transplanted in australia as well.

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