breathing rate

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Retarded_at_bio
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breathing rate

Post by Retarded_at_bio » Fri Apr 21, 2006 12:08 am

When the amount of carbon dioxide in your blood increases does your brain slow down your breathing rate? I was just curious. Can some1 explain? Thanks!
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AstusAleator
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Post by AstusAleator » Fri Apr 21, 2006 3:35 am

I'm not an authority on this, but it seems like your brain would increase your breathing rate, in order to get more O2 in and CO2 out.
However, with increased CO2 in your blood, comes less energy effectiveness, aka you get sluggish, sleepy, pass-out, etc.
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Post by kiekyon » Fri Apr 21, 2006 8:59 am

Breathing is basically intended to provide your cells (brain, heart, and so on)with oxygen (in order to maintain their activity) and to remove outside of your body the carbon dioxide which is the result of your cells' activity.

Regulation of respiration is therefore based upon two triggers, i.e. the level of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your blood. Sensors are disseminated within blood vessels, and provide information to your brain regarding what is presently happening. You breathe, oxygen is injected through your lungs and carbon dioxide removed.

According to metabolism (higher when you run than when you are seated reading a book), oxygen tends to decrease and carbon dioxide increase in your blood. As soon as a determined level is crossed, the sensors inform your brain which activates your phrenic nerve and generates an inspiration. You breathe, and ... (see upper paragraph)

You can train in order to hold your breath for a longer time. A good example are scuba divers. You will be used to tolerate a higher level of carbon dioxide in your blood, but eventually your brain will send an order "Breathe!".
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Post by Retarded_at_bio » Fri Apr 21, 2006 3:47 pm

Thanx 4 answering my question. U guys rok!
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Post by Darby » Mon Apr 24, 2006 4:22 pm

We don't actually monitor oxygen levels directly - being locked into red blood cells, it's not accessible - so we monitor carbon dioxide, which is just dissolved in the plasma and easier to get at. That's why carbon monoxide poisoning is so insidious - it locks onto hemoglobin, lowering oxygen levels, but your hypothalamus can't detect that, so you just continue to breathe normally.

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