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Linn
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Post by Linn » Wed Apr 19, 2006 11:26 am

David George wrote:You can the say the answer is none of these as some frogs have internal fertilization some have external,some slamanders have gills some have lungs so I think it would be easier to tell if they give a specific species.


:shock: oh case re-opened :!:
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Beetle
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Post by Beetle » Thu Apr 20, 2006 8:47 am

David George wrote:You can the say the answer is none of these as some frogs have internal fertilization some have external,some slamanders have gills some have lungs so I think it would be easier to tell if they give a specific species.


Really? I didnt know that. Can you please post some examples of frogs that have internal fertilization.
And when we are talking about salamanders are we talking about fam. Salamandridae or ordo Caudata (what is the common name for these second?)?
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AstusAleator
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Post by AstusAleator » Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:16 am

So the only characteristic left to look at would be the digestive tract. I believe salamaners and frogs both have similar digestive tracts though, so David is probably right.
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Post by [email protected] » Wed Jun 28, 2006 4:25 am

Clammy!? Maybe I think that or lungfish

123Herpatology
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Post by 123Herpatology » Sun Jul 02, 2006 2:46 am

it can't be a poisen arrow frog, those do not have camoflauged epidermis...and the term epidermis...very misleading. There are different layers so yah. My guess would be a cane toad, however those are not frogs, and live in dry areas.
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Post by Darby » Sun Jul 02, 2006 1:45 pm

As many people have noted, there are a couple things on the list it could NOT be -

Snake & clam.

And one it's unlikely to be -

Lungfish (toxic epidermis is usually fairly useless in water, especially fresh water, which is the main habitat of lungfish).

It could be a frog or a salamander (although many salamanders go through less of a larval stage than frogs), and even though you might be able to find exceptions to the listed features, the groups in general fit okay...except...

In frogs and salamanders, the toxic ones generally are marked with warning colors, not camouflaged. It's bad form to give general features for some things on the list and then give a feature that would only fit a few exceptions, but the question is still valid.

Toads would fit better. Their toxins are mild, and they depend more on camouflage to avoid predators. Too bad it's not a choice.

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