D and L isomers of monosachrides

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Mjhavok
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D and L isomers of monosachrides

Post by Mjhavok » Tue Apr 04, 2006 4:12 pm

What are the nutritional and health implications of using D and L isomers of monosaccharides.
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Post by Trev » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:46 pm

I believe, it`s not important. Because our ferments cut only bonds. D and L - are only orientation of molecules.
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Post by Ultrashogun » Sat Apr 08, 2006 7:59 pm

I think L sugars wouldnt work due to stereospecifity of enzyms.

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Post by victor » Sun Apr 09, 2006 12:02 pm

Ultrashogun wrote:I think L sugars wouldnt work due to stereospecifity of enzyms.


Yup, you got it right shogun....our sugar hydrolysis enzymes are stereospecific to it's substrate which is D-glucose. And usually, sugar like glucose are oftenly in it's natural form which is in D-form. Beside, our tongue also has a stereospecific pappilae which interprate 'sweet' as we taste D-glucose and interpretate 'bitter' as we taste L-glucose...:lol:

I you wanna know more about sugar (generally carbohydrate), I suggest you better hurry get your organic chemistry book and open stereochemistry chapter....(that's or the beginning.. :lol: )
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Post by Ultrashogun » Sun Apr 09, 2006 4:17 pm

Is there any harm in ingesting L-isomers?

I ask that because I read somewhere, that many pharmacological substances, advil for example, are actually racemic and that not only is one isomer not active, but also inhibits and thus delays the effect by some time.

Im thinking this because you say that L sugars taste bitter, and bitter is usually a taste which would cause an animal to stop consumption.

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Post by Mjhavok » Sun Apr 09, 2006 5:52 pm

For instance the enzyme permease I have read is very stereospecific.

Thanks for the input guys.
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Post by victor » Tue Apr 11, 2006 6:21 am

what we consume is sucrose isn't it? and we know that sucroce is racemic, so, there's no bitter taste or anything..:lol:
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