What makes perennial plants so special?

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Nirvana
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What makes perennial plants so special?

Post by Nirvana » Mon Mar 20, 2006 8:23 am

I have been thinking about this problem for years. Why are perennial plants the only species that have indeterminate growth? Why doesn't the Hayflick Limit theory apply on them?

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Post by kiekyon » Mon Mar 20, 2006 9:02 am

i'm not sure, but i think it has something to do with centriol

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Mon Mar 20, 2006 7:49 pm

What the heck is the heyflick limit theory?
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Nirvana
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Here is the link...

Post by Nirvana » Mon Mar 20, 2006 9:01 pm

Hayflick Limit is the theory proposed by Dr. Leonard Hayflick in the early 60's.
Basically it says that cell division has a limited amount of times. For example, human cell can go under about 50 times of cell division, then it will die.

The following is a link you can click on and read the theory.
http://www.totse.com/en/fringe/life_extension/age5.html

However, this theory doesn't aplly on perennial plants, otherwise they wouldn't be able to have indeterminate growth. Theoretically if perennial plants are healthy and there are no environmental traumas, they can live on as long as they are capable of, they are nearly immortal.

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Post by kiekyon » Tue Mar 21, 2006 1:21 am

well, i've heard though i'm not 100% sure
the number of time a cell can divide depend on the centriol
each time it divide, centriol become shorter until it disappear
plants dont have centriol
however u may want to make further research on this
as i say i'm not 100% sure

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mith
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Post by mith » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:23 am

lol, not totse. I love that site but it's usually very hard to tell the wackos from the geniuses(genii?)
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Nirvana
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Yeah...I've heard of it

Post by Nirvana » Tue Mar 21, 2006 6:18 am

I have heard about the centriol gets shorter after each cell division, but I didn't know that plant cell doesn't have centriol (I don't remember)

Then what about other plant species?? They all have life limit as any other animal does. That's why it made me so confused, why perennial plants are so special among all living creatures on this planet??

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Linn
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Post by Linn » Wed Mar 22, 2006 12:49 pm

Nirvana: why perennial plants are so special among all living creatures on

how about more specifically, some trees are special. :)
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Post by MrMistery » Wed Mar 22, 2006 6:52 pm

hate to burst your bubble, but a plant cell doesn't even have centrioles. If you distroy the centriols in an animal cell with a laser, a spindle will still form and it will undergo mitosis normally. The role of centrioles is not yet known. Most opionions are that centrioles help support the organising of microtubules. However, more data is required.

Also, the rule with the 50 divisions/cell only applies to some cell in the human body. For example, stem cells can divide undefinetly. So can the meristems of plants. It's just that in cells that only live one year, they can only reach a certain hight.
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kabuto
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Post by kabuto » Wed Apr 12, 2006 4:52 am

not centriol, it should be telomere

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Post by kiekyon » Wed Apr 12, 2006 3:05 pm

ah yes, sorry i have mistaken between the two
take a look at this

http://cropandsoil.oregonstate.edu/classes/css430/more_on_telomeres.htm

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