Protein inhibitors

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GreenDog
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Protein inhibitors

Post by GreenDog » Thu Mar 16, 2006 3:02 pm

How can I find a specific inhibitor of a certain protein?
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Post by Helix » Fri Mar 17, 2006 12:02 pm

I guess when you use for instance a crude protein extract for cytokine induction by eukaryotic cells, you can use specific antibodies against your protein to inhibit its activity.

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Post by MrMistery » Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:26 pm

It depends on what kind of protein you're working with. An enzyme? An ion channel? etc
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Post by victor » Sat Mar 18, 2006 11:25 am

I can think one example of protein (in this term, an enzyme) inhibitors...
Let's just make the sample is haemoglobine.
If we see from it's structure, Hb has Fe2+ substance attached into heme (total 4 hemes)...this fe2+ is used to bind O2 because of it's reactivity with O2 to form complex of Hb-ligands.
So, from this, we can find the proper substance to change the ligand (in this term, just make it CN- ion) so it will be a complex of: Hb-CN (that's what I call inhibitors :lol: ).
actually, we can think another sobstance that can perform this kind of action such as CO, NO2, and others....

well, that's what I think of enzyme's competitive inhibitors... :D correct me if I'm wrong...
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Post by MrMistery » Sat Mar 18, 2006 8:38 pm

enzymes have competitive inhibition, allosteric inhibition, retroinhibition etc. But the situation is more complex when you are working with big proteins, such as the Na/K pump. By the way, NA/K pump inhibitors are digitonine and oubaine... :lol:
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