Invertabrates!

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oscar91
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Invertabrates!

Post by oscar91 » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:20 pm

are all invertebrates cold blooded?

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x_forensics=life_x
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Post by x_forensics=life_x » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:38 pm

Yes. All invertebrates are cold-blooded. Cold-blooded invertebrates include those such as fish, reptiles, and amphibians, etc. They control their body temperatures through the process of thermoregulation.

(I'm hoping that I am right in saying this.)
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Post by damien james » Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:20 pm

x_forensics=life_x wrote:Yes. All invertebrates are cold-blooded. Cold-blooded invertebrates include those such as fish, reptiles, and amphibians, etc. They control their body temperatures through the process of thermoregulation.

(I'm hoping that I am right in saying this.)


Invertebrates DON'T have a backbone.

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Post by x_forensics=life_x » Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:20 am

damien james wrote:
x_forensics=life_x wrote:Yes. All invertebrates are cold-blooded. Cold-blooded invertebrates include those such as fish, reptiles, and amphibians, etc. They control their body temperatures through the process of thermoregulation.

(I'm hoping that I am right in saying this.)


Invertebrates DON'T have a backbone.




Wow. lmao. I didn't even realized that I had said that. I'm a freakin' genius. (Except not.) Forgive me everyone. I think I'll go and just sit in a corner and sulk over my own stupidity now. :)


By the way, thank you VERY much for correcting me. It was a freakishly pathetic mistake that I made. Again, I hadn't even realized that I said that. Lovely

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cardiorrhexis
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Re: Invertabrates!

Post by cardiorrhexis » Thu Mar 16, 2006 2:57 am

oscar91 wrote:are all invertebrates cold blooded?


no. i don't even think all intervertebrates have blood. (ie: protozoa)

:?:

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Re: Invertabrates!

Post by kiekyon » Thu Mar 16, 2006 9:57 am

cardiorrhexis wrote:i don't even think all intervertebrates have blood. (ie: protozoa)


do u really need to have blood to be cold blooded??
and does it have to be cold???

my understanding is that cold blooded only means limited ability to influence its internal body temperature.

also invertebrate and vertebrate is classified under animal kingdom, so that would in my opinion exclude protozoa

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Post by Ken Ramos » Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:13 am

kiekyon wrote:

also invertebrate and vertebrate is classified under animal kingdom, so that would in my opinion exclude protozoa


You are correct kiekyon. Protozoa have their own little kingdom, at least for now. Protista.

I would venture to say that not all invertebrates are found in cold or cool environments, which is what I think oscar91 may be getting at. For example caterpillars are found where it is warm, earthworms where it is sort of cool, and mayfly nymphs in cold mountain streams, insects where it is warm, they have no backbone but an exoskeleton, etc... If I am wrong, someone pls. correct me also. :lol: :D
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Post by MrMistery » Thu Mar 16, 2006 6:52 pm

I would answer yes to the inital question. It is true that the blood of some invertebrates is warm, cause they live in warm environments, but the terms cold-blooded and warm-blooded mean endothermic and exothermic. The term cold-blooded is ambigous, so that's why using ectothermic is better..

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Poison
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Post by Poison » Fri Mar 17, 2006 5:30 pm

Yes, as biologists we should stop using the term cold blooded. Because they are not "cold". Poikliotherm or heterotherm or ectotherm is better.
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mith
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Post by mith » Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:48 pm

Exceptions

http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/imag ... dwarm.html

Some animals do not fall neatly into the categories of being warm or cold-blooded. Bats, for example, are mammals who cannot maintain a constant body temperature and cool off when they are not active. Echidnas maintain a range of body temperatures which usually lies between 77 and 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit and have difficulty cooling down. Mole Rats are another group of mammals who are unable to regulate their body temperature, however, since they live underground, the temperature of their environment does not change much. Some warm-blooded animals, such as bears, groundhogs, gophers and bats hibernate during the cold winter. During hibernation these animals live off of stored body fat and can drop their body temperatures by as much as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The Hawk Moth is an insect which can raise its body temperature well above the temperature of its surroundings when it is flying because of its huge wing muscles which generate heat when in use. Bees are another example of insects that can raise their body temperatures above that of their environment by moving their wings rapidly to generate heat.
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Post by MrMistery » Fri Mar 17, 2006 7:24 pm

There are exceptions to everything mith... Bu if 99.999% are ectotherms, i think it's safe to say all of them...
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David George
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Post by David George » Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:51 pm

Guess what there is one cold-blooded mammal that is the naked mole rat .I am not sure if I can use that they are cold blooded but I know that they can change their body temperature.They are really unique animals.There are more interesting facts

Respiration plays an important role, because in the tunnels there exists hardly any oxygen. The lungs of this animal are built very small, so therefore they have blood with a very strong affinity for oxygen, which uses oxygen quite efficiently. It has a very low respiration and metabolism rate for an animal of its size, which uses oxygen minimally. In long periods of hunger, such as a drought, this rate can sink up to 25 percent.

The skin of naked mole rats lacks a key neurotransmitter called Substance P that is responsible in mammals for sending pain signals to the central nervous system. Therefore, when naked mole rats are cut, scraped or burned, they feel no pain. When injected with Substance P, however, the pain signalling works as it does in other mammals.
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