ADD'P to ADP

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Thu Mar 02, 2006 6:39 pm

First of all ATP probably has no taste at all as i do not see the evolutionary importance of having a receptor for ATP..

Now, as i said, it is a matter of evolution from my point of view. It just was easier for things to evolve this way, given the chemical equilibrium between ATP and ADP+Pi. Could another mechanism evolve using ADP? Of course... In evolution many things are possible, as long as they don't break the rules of chemistry.
It's like asking why are we carbon based life forms and not nitrogen based? Well, even though nitrogen based life could have arisen, given it's chemical properties, it was easier for carbon life to appear... It would have been possible another way...
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victor
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Post by victor » Fri Mar 03, 2006 11:01 am

beside, hydrolyzing ATP into ADP + Pi is easier and more efficient than hydrolyzing ADP into AMP + Pi..
If, still confuse, please take a look at reaction kinetics of ATP and ADP hydrolation
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Post by 2810712 » Fri Mar 03, 2006 1:02 pm

Yes! But if ATP can induce any change in conformation or lead to a chemical change...and may block or accelerate any specific taste receptor...or have its own taste something like something else...

Abt The ADD'P q, its no problem now...thanks guys.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Fri Mar 03, 2006 6:21 pm

Well, there is no way for it to get inside the cell. As you know, in a signal transduction pathway involving a hidrophilic first mesager, the molecule doesn't enter the cell. So if it hasn't got a receptor to take the message forward it has no taste
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Post by 2810712 » Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:10 am

I thought that those receptors are presented on the cell surface...that was wrong so...good evolutionary trick to avoid harm from 'unknown' molecules...

Tasty stuff Andrew, thanks!


hrushikesh

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