what is 16S rDNA

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purna
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what is 16S rDNA

Post by purna » Tue Feb 21, 2006 4:33 am

can u please tel me what is 16S rDNA and why is it very useful in the identification of specefic species of microorganisms.Thank you

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Post by blazerUAB » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:54 am

16S rDNA is the gene that codes for 16S rRNA. 16S rRNA helps compose the small ribosomal subunit. As to why its good for identifying microorganisms, I have only a slght idea which has to due with variances in the introns and exons that are species specific.

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canalon
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Post by canalon » Tue Feb 21, 2006 12:44 pm

it is an essential gene so it is conserved in all species.
And its mutation rate on average, as good as estimation can be, allow enough variability between species yet almost idententical at the species level, so it is good marker of evolutionnary links at the species level.

And by the way no introns or exons in the bacteria...
Last edited by canalon on Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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blazerUAB
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Oops

Post by blazerUAB » Tue Feb 21, 2006 4:45 pm

Thanks for the correction and clarification, I had a little brain fart there.

2810712
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Post by 2810712 » Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:35 pm

oh so it is related to the mutual divorse... but nobody helped me on that.. :cry: [/url]

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canalon
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Post by canalon » Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:46 pm

2810712 wrote:oh so it is related to the mutual divorse... but nobody helped me on that.. :cry:


I am not quite sure I understand that. What is mutual divorce?
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any proof. (Ashley Montague)

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Post by 2810712 » Wed Feb 22, 2006 7:04 am

Le Mutuale Divorce:-
Its one of my posts-

http://www.biology-online.org/biology-f ... al+divorce

'll be glad to receive help on that...

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Sepals
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Re: Oops

Post by Sepals » Fri Feb 24, 2006 1:21 pm

blazerUAB wrote:Thanks for the correction and clarification, I had a little brain fart there.
Just to help make it clearer as it hasn't been mentioned yet, 16S rRNA is only found in bacteria and is the evolutionary marker used for these. In eukaryotes (species that have cells with nuclei and organelles) 18 rRNA exists instead which is used as an evolutionary marker also.
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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:37 pm

And i read that the 16s rRNA in Archea is similar to the 18s in eukaryotes. It is one of the things that determined scientists to split bacteria from Archea
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Post by Sepals » Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:01 pm

MrMistery wrote:And i read that the 16s rRNA in Archea is similar to the 18s in eukaryotes. It is one of the things that determined scientists to split bacteria from Archea
That's really interesting. :mrgreen:
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Post by MrMistery » Sat Feb 25, 2006 7:15 pm

Biology is interesting ;)
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Post by Sepals » Sun Feb 26, 2006 12:16 am

MrMistery wrote:Biology is interesting ;)
That's why I study it. :)
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