enzymes

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jess7
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enzymes

Post by jess7 » Mon Feb 13, 2006 10:26 am

hi...im not too sure if these are correct so could you guys help me try to work them out?
what type of organic molecule is an enzyme? is it proteins?

are the chemical elements that make up an enzyme molecule, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen?

the building blocks which bond together to form an enzyme molecule...amino acids??

how the enzyme active site holds its specific shape and how this shape is affected by temperature and pH.. i really dont have a clue about this one...has it got something to do with the optomum temperature range and the 3D structure?

if anyone can help me work thru these i would appreaciate it alot thanks :)

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victor
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Post by victor » Mon Feb 13, 2006 10:58 am

1. proteins, organic molecules (coenzymes) and sometimes metal substances (as cofactors).

2. sometime with S (Cysteine amino-acid) and Se (Selenocysteine amino acid).

3. amino acids will act as enzyme precursor which determine the primary structure of an enzyme.

4. It's related with sec-structure (ALPHA-HELIX :lol:), tertiary and quartenary structure..
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jess7
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Post by jess7 » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:11 am

thanks for that!
so with 4. because pleating or coiling, held by hydrogen bonds between the amino acids. then the protein fold into 3d shape and there are two or more polypeptide combined together?

th1_rhs13
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Post by th1_rhs13 » Tue Feb 14, 2006 10:07 pm

The enzyme(s) will actually change conformation when the substrates have binded to the active site, allowong for the substrated to be confined, within the this duration it undergoes 3 critical processes that all enzymes undergo: Intiation, Transition state facilitation, and Temination which then allows for the enzyme to return to its original state and allow for its active site to be accessable-- provided thier isn't an inhibitor present.

However, depending on the particular enzyme you're reffering to their is an optium temperature for its fucntion. Their is not set 'viable' temp for all enzymes. See this is where it get interesting and you need math, becuase the amount of substrate and enzyme contact is dependednt on the collision rates which can be obtained by means of the Delta-G formula. Its difficult but highly intrigiung!

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