Triglycerides?

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Host
Garter
Garter
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:21 pm

Triglycerides?

Post by Host » Thu Feb 09, 2006 11:49 pm

Little help, might be to hard but what better place than this?

1. Which of the the following types of lipids fuctions (in part) as communication (hormonal) molecules
1. triglycerides
2. steriods
3. cholesterol
4. fats
5. phospholipids

2. How many fatty acid tails would you find in a polyunsaturated oil? ie triglyceride
1. 1
2. 2
3. 3
4. none


True/False
1. ALL animal triglycerides form a solid at room temperature and ALL plant triglycerides form a liquid at room temperature (if false give an example)

2. A molecule with the follwoing molecular formula ( C subscript 22, H subscript 40, and 0 subscript 21) is likely a carbohydrate


like i said...give it yer best shot

MUAAHAHAHAH

- Host

sdekivit
King Cobra
King Cobra
Posts: 586
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:16 pm
Location: holland
Contact:

Post by sdekivit » Fri Feb 10, 2006 8:36 am

looks like homework questions

--> i bet that in your textbook, the general structure of lipids and carbohydrates is discussed !
With this structure, the answers to the questions should be easy :)

User avatar
victor
King Cobra
King Cobra
Posts: 2668
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2005 12:01 pm
Location: Yogyakarta, Indonesia..
Contact:

Post by victor » Fri Feb 10, 2006 10:29 am

Number 1.
Open your biology textbook and read the function of those examples you gave.

Number 2.
Just refer to it's name...you'll get it..:wink:

True/False
Number 1.
what kind of fat that animals and plants have?? how's their characteristic?? I bet, your organic chemie book have the answer..

Number 2.
What is the empirical formula of carbohydrate?? open your organic chemie book...again.

Answer all your own question, post them here and we'll discuss it together..
Regards,
Victor.
E. anythingus
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.

Host
Garter
Garter
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:21 pm

Post by Host » Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:24 pm

not homework just questions im asked in the back of my biology book (which doesnt have a key) which i cant find, that im trying to use to study for my exam, the books "Biology, 7th ed. Campbell and Reece" with the fiddlehead on the cover.

For one i was thinking steriods(hormonal) {which goes with my notes} but my book has choles. under steriods {as do my notes} , which in turn makes it seem that they also func. in some kind of aspect as a communicator, yet no specific example is given for either of the two, so it seems that choles. is a more specific example of a steriod yet both seem to be communicators, im confused...

As for two, my answ. would be 3 fatty acid tails, which im pretty sure on but wanted to check

And for the T/F
It says (in my notes and book) MOST animal fats are soild, and MOST plant fats form a liquid, but no where does it say ALL, so i was thinking theres got to be a unique animal/plant fat out there that doesnt subscribe to these boundries or else it would specifically state ALL in the book, plus what if u hydrolize a plant fat

and for 2. i have no clue



thanks for the help though
- Host

and i dont have an organic chem book, havent taken that class yet guess i should have before cell :lol:

Host
Garter
Garter
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:21 pm

Post by Host » Sat Feb 11, 2006 8:43 pm

any help? hmmmm

User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN
Contact:

Post by mith » Sun Feb 12, 2006 12:15 am

carbohydrates will have the empirical form ch2o
If you hydrolize a plant fat, you'd get something similar to magarine, which is solid.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr

Host
Garter
Garter
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:21 pm

Post by Host » Sun Feb 12, 2006 2:33 am

so hydrolizing would simply be a way to change it then from sat/unsat. which would falsify the statement, yet would ALL animal fats themselves, plant fats included, in thier natrual states subscribe to these boundries. hard to believe theres no one animal fat out the entire range of spp on this earth that wouldnt subscribe to this?

for the carbon question, how would u know how many water molc. to take out/add for hydrolization/polymerzation.and to the quest;basically ur saysing anything with the molecules C,H & O would constitue as a carb? no matter the atomic number or mass number...

anbody know anything about numb. 1 ?

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:49 am

Cholesterol is the steroid from which steroid hormones are produced. Examples of steroid hormones are testosterone, estrogen and cortizol. Even though cholesterol is a steroid, teh required answer would be deffinetly steroids, since cholesterol doesn't function as a hormon, it is only the stuff the body uses to make the hormones.

A carbohidrate, as DAve said, has the empirical formula (CH2O)n. This means that something, in order to be a carbohidrate, needs to have the C:H:O ratio of 1:2:1. Also, all carbohidrates need to have a carbonil bond.
Do not be confused by the definition. Here is a very simple conterexample: CH2O(formaldehide). This stuff has a carbonil bond and the propper ratio, yet it is not a carbohidrate. But, except for this molecule, the deffinition works for everything...

Regards,
Andrew
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

User avatar
victor
King Cobra
King Cobra
Posts: 2668
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2005 12:01 pm
Location: Yogyakarta, Indonesia..
Contact:

Post by victor » Sun Feb 12, 2006 11:04 am

let me make it simple....all carbohydrate groups fulfill the CH2O empirical formula...But CH2O empirical formula itself doesn't only represent carbohydrate..
- C6H12O6 = [CH2O]6 --> a carbohydrate
- CH3COOH = [CH2O]2 --> not a carbohydrate
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.

Host
Garter
Garter
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:21 pm

Post by Host » Mon Feb 13, 2006 12:27 am

so let me get this straight, anything with the 1;2;1 ratio is a carb (ie. C6H12O6 but in the case of C22.H40.O21 would not be b/c to be two to one C would have to equal 0 so itd have to be C22H40.022?

and back to the animal/plant, would the types of lipids which make up both of these matter? Does anyone know what lipids per say make up animal cell memb. ? i was thinking both triglycerides (fats) & cholesterol but my roomate tells me its cholesterol and triglycerdies...(but couldnt it just be phospholipids) yet in looking back into the book this doesnt help me figure out whether all animal fats are solid and all plants are liquid? could someone explain why this statement might be true if it is?

-thnx for the help guys, sorry for all the quest.
Host

baikuza
Coral
Coral
Posts: 429
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:09 am
Location: Yogyakarta, indonesia, south-east asia
Contact:

Post by baikuza » Mon Feb 13, 2006 7:25 am

i'm wondering. is this your home work or something like that?

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Mon Feb 13, 2006 6:20 pm

The cell membrane is made out of 2 big kinds of lipids: phospholipids and steroids.
Pshopholipids are the same at all organisms. The most important are phosphatidilcholine, phosphatidilserine, phosphatidiletanolamine, sphingomielyn(hope i spelled them correctly). Steroids differ in animal, plant and bacterian cell.
ANimals cells have cholesterol in their membranes. plant cells have phytosterol in their membranes. Bacteria don't generally have steroids in their membranes, but there are a few exceptions. The genus Opanois, for example, has a kind of steroid called hopanoid....
The cellular membrane does not contain triglycerids. These lipids are only used for storage of fats so they can be used for energy later

Hope this information helps
Regards,
Andrew
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests