Forensics

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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boydog
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Forensics

Post by boydog » Thu Jan 12, 2006 8:35 am

What is the role of the scientist in forensic?

What are the advantages and limitations of the Scientific Method as applied to forensics?

i do not even know how the scientific method is applied to forensics, so someone please help. thanks

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Dr.Stein
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Post by Dr.Stein » Thu Jan 12, 2006 9:33 am

First of all, you need to know the job description of scientists in forensic. If you already understand it, you will be able to apply scientific method on how those people do their job by yourselves. Now, answer my question: What is forensics? :)
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victor
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Post by victor » Thu Jan 12, 2006 12:35 pm

Oh, by the way..talking about forensic, do you know the meaning of this sentence? If I'm not mistaken it says "visum et repertum" and "visum et vivum"..
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.

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Post by Dr.Stein » Fri Jan 13, 2006 8:53 am

visum et repertum = investigation in dead body
visum et vivum = investigation in living body
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zami'87.
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Post by zami'87. » Fri Jan 13, 2006 10:38 am


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victor
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Post by victor » Fri Jan 13, 2006 12:32 pm

@Dr.Stein
ahh...you're good in those funny language doctor...:lol:
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.

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Post by Dr.Stein » Fri Jan 13, 2006 1:47 pm

That's how I learn Biology, never memorizing a term but understanding the meaning of each word from where it belongs ;)
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Post by boydog » Sat Jan 14, 2006 5:00 am

Forensics or forensic science is the application of science to questions which are of interest to the legal system as well as social sciences such as archaeology.

so?

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Dr.Stein
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Post by Dr.Stein » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:30 am

What? Are you sure? :shock: Well, your definition might be correct but do you get the point from it? I don't :P

Here an article I found about forensics, I think this will explain you much better so you can understand it and able to apply the scientific method by yourselves :)

What is Forensics?

Definition
: The study of evidence discovered at a crime scene and used in a court of law.
Context: The author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was also responsible for furthering the work of forensic science by applying the principles of fingerprinting and firearm identification to criminal investigation work.

Forensic science is any science used for the purposes of the law, and therefore provides impartial scientific evidence for use in the courts of law, and in a criminal investigation and trial. Forensic science is a multidisciplinary subject, drawing principally from chemistry and biology, but also from physics, geology, psychology, social science, etc.

In a typical criminal investigation crime-scene investigators, sometimes known as scene-of-crime officers, will gather material evidence from the crime scene, victim and/or suspect. Forensic scientists will examine these materials to provide scientific evidence to assist in the investigation and court proceedings, and thus work closely with the police. Senior forensic scientists, who usually specialize in one or more of the key forensic disciplines, may be required to attend crime scenes or give evidence in court as impartial expert witnesses.

Examples of forensic science include the use of gas chromatography to identify seized drugs, DNA profiling to help identify a murder suspect from a bloodstain found at the crime scene, and laser Raman spectroscopy to identify microscopic paint fragments.

From examining hair follicles in a lab to scouring a crime scene looking for left behind clues, forensics is a big part of the crime world. It happens every day. It can be a little complicated but great minds have found true suspects. It revolves around evidence. That can include:

Blood samples
Common sense..the blood left behind at a crime scene will reveal a person's blood type and possibly their identity.

Fingerprints
They are sorted into different categories and therefore reduce the number of suspects.

Footprints/Shoe prints
Strangely enough, footprints and shoe prints in sand and soft ground can tell about a person's shoe size and what type of shoe they wear. From there, they narrow down the number of people who have bought those type of shoes.

Hair Follicles
A single hair strand left at the scene can show a person's DNA, which is one of a kind, and could tell you everything about a person.

Vehicles
Sometimes the car at the scene of the crime will try to be hidden, but when found, can be traced by a license number and the make and model to the person who purchased the vehicle.

Dust, dirt, etc

Dirt and dust could provide DNA also.

Semen, body fluids
These important clues, especially in assault cases will determine directly who a criminal is, simply by DNA.

Little things such as cigarette buds, candy wrappers, etc
This is also a good clue to DNA evidence.

DNA: The Basis of Forensics
A revolution has occurred in the last few decades that explains how DNA makes us look like our parents and how a faulty gene can cause disease. This revolution opens the door to curing illness, both hereditary and contracted. The door has also been opened to an ethical debate over the full use of our new knowledge. In the end, curiosity is the reason to learn about DNA. Fittingly, curiosity is the driving force behind science itself.
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Jan 15, 2006 7:31 pm

Gotta love Dr.Stein's articles
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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Post by Dr.Stein » Tue Jan 17, 2006 4:37 am

Hehe as I said ;) :)
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Post by 2810712 » Tue Jan 17, 2006 5:09 am

really a good teacher you form Dr Dr...

Bytheway, if you can get it more properly by watching crime investigation programs on discovery channel. These contains some vedeo clipping of scientists doing gas chromatography and DNA fingerprinting. But some scenes of these programs may be psychologically disturbing.

Shrei

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