Oxygen requirements of eukaryotes

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sosippus
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Oxygen requirements of eukaryotes

Post by sosippus » Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:22 am

Hi!

Is any of you aware of any resources where I can find information about the oxygen requirement for growth of eukaryotes?

As an example, say I'd like to know whether Candida dubliniensis, Lodderomyces elongisporus or Encephalitozoon intestinalis are aerobes, anaerobes, microaerophilic, etc.

Thanks

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Mon Sep 22, 2014 9:34 am

probably some microbio books. Or try to contact microbio department at your local University.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Post by josem » Wed Sep 24, 2014 5:28 pm

I think you can use a test, where semi-solid agar taken in test tube, which will a gradation of oxygen concentration. Surface have normal oxygen concentration and when we go downwards its concentration gradualy decreases. At near bottom there is no oxygen at all. If we add suitable nutrients in the agar and innoculate with a needle (stab innoculation) after suitable incubation time we can know microbe's oxygen requirements. Aerophile grow on the top, microaerophile in middle and anerobic at bottom. It will work well with culturable bacteria. I am not sure will it work with eukaryotic microorganisms or not.
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sosippus
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Re:

Post by sosippus » Wed Sep 24, 2014 7:44 pm

JackBean wrote:probably some microbio books. Or try to contact microbio department at your local University.


Well thank you. I don't want to be rude, but this is not very helpful... "Some microbio books" is not very specific, and telling me to speak with someone else isn't very helpful either...

josem wrote:I think you can use a test, where semi-solid agar taken in test tube, which will a gradation of oxygen concentration. Surface have normal oxygen concentration and when we go downwards its concentration gradualy decreases. At near bottom there is no oxygen at all. If we add suitable nutrients in the agar and innoculate with a needle (stab innoculation) after suitable incubation time we can know microbe's oxygen requirements. Aerophile grow on the top, microaerophile in middle and anerobic at bottom. It will work well with culturable bacteria. I am not sure will it work with eukaryotic microorganisms or not.

This is a cool idea. However, this doesn't help me either. I am looking for information already known, and I would like to have specific growth rates, not just information on whether or not an organism would grow or not. And since I have no way to do this on a large scale this won't help.
Regarding your proposed experiment, there is something that I would like to ask: if you do the experiment as you are saying, wouldn't the atmospheric oxygen simply permeate the agar to the bottom layers? Further, the organisms at the top would produce reactive oxygen species that could affect the anaerobes, so they would still not survive greatly. And growing very different organisms would eventually make the ones that have faster growth outcompete the ones with slow growth. Given that aerobic organisms *generally* have faster growth rates because ATP production is greater from respiration than from fermentation, aerobic organisms should grow faster and outcompete the others.

...so yeah, I appreciate the comments, but this is not very helpful :(

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Post by josem » Mon Oct 27, 2014 9:27 pm

Procedure I mentioned above is a standard procedure present in microbiology text books (eg. Prescott).
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Post by sosippus » Fri Oct 31, 2014 1:08 pm

Yes, but not very easy to apply in a systematic way (i.e. to ~2000 organisms, bacteria/archeia/eukaryotes). Given that all of these are characterized and even have their genomes decoded, I would expect to find a way to systematically get the information that I am looking for.

I ended up writing a program that extracts this information from NCBI

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Sat Nov 08, 2014 5:13 pm

you do it one by one, not all together of course. And it's not that difficult to do that with say 200 samples.

Just curious about the results you got.
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Hrushikesh
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Re: Oxygen requirements of eukaryotes

Post by Hrushikesh » Sat Dec 13, 2014 2:07 am

Here is a user's guide for parasites, may have some of your organisms with their oxygen requirement:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320384,

Also, I know of Bergey's manual for bacterial taxonomy, you could check if something similar exists for all of the eukaryotic microbes.


Hrushikesh.

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