Recessive and dominant genetics - Pitx1 case study

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scienceguy914
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Recessive and dominant genetics - Pitx1 case study

Post by scienceguy914 » Mon Sep 08, 2014 1:44 am

Hey, so in my readings on recessive and dominant genetics, I have come across a question that is pretty basic but still stumping me (maybe from burning my eyes with endless hours of reading)

Question: How would a mouse embryo differ from the ones pictured above if the scientists were able to modify the regulatory regions of the mouse Pitx1 gene to be similar to those of a freshwater stickleback that does not produce pelvic spines.

v this is what my text says on the basic diagram
"This Scientists generated mouse embryos in which the Pitx1 gene was mutated, making the Pitx1 protein non-functional from the start of mouse development. The images of the Pitx1 “knockout” mouse shown below on the right reveal striking differences in morphology of the jaw and hind limbs between the normal and Pitx1 -/- experimental embryos. "

I feel that it would cause the mice to be born with no pelvis because the trait is recessive, however i am not sure? Is there anyone to shed light on this for me?

The 2nd question in this reading is involving active and in active genes
Which regions in the Pitx1 gene complex (below) do you expect to be functional and which regions are non-functional in manatees or dolphins without hindlimbs? what about the dolphin with the hindlimb atavism.

Than in the following graph the traits listed are Pelvis(green circle), nose(red square), jaw (blue triangle)

to be honest the 2nd question has me completley stumped

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