Mitochondrial DNA

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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Hannamerika
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Mitochondrial DNA

Post by Hannamerika » Sat Sep 06, 2014 7:10 pm

Does Mitochondrial DNA have anything to do with physical traits, such as hair color, eye color, size etc?

Zargo
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Re: Mitochondrial DNA

Post by Zargo » Sun Sep 07, 2014 5:02 am

Hannamerika wrote:Does Mitochondrial DNA have anything to do with physical traits, such as hair color, eye color, size etc?


As far as I know, no.

mtDNA encodes some of the various components for the mitochondria such as the ETC (Electron Transport Chain) proteins such as ATP synthase and it's own ribosomal genes.

Here is a pretty good representation of what mtDNA looks like.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... DNA_en.svg

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jonmoulton
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Re: Mitochondrial DNA

Post by jonmoulton » Mon Sep 08, 2014 5:23 pm

There are genetic diseases caused by defects carried on the mitochondrial chromosome that can have clear phenotypic consequences. http://www.umdf.org/site/c.8qKOJ0MvF7LUG/b.7934627/k.3711/What_is_Mitochondrial_Disease.htm

wildfunguy
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Re: Mitochondrial DNA

Post by wildfunguy » Wed Nov 19, 2014 8:18 pm

jonmoulton wrote:There are genetic diseases caused by defects carried on the mitochondrial chromosome that can have clear phenotypic consequences. http://www.umdf.org/site/c.8qKOJ0MvF7LUG/b.7934627/k.3711/What_is_Mitochondrial_Disease.htm


But a quick read suggests they don'y produce "traits" like the distinct phenotypes of Mendel's pea plants.
http://www.umdf.org/site/pp.aspx?c=8qKO ... &b=7934627
Read the sections on genocopies and phenocopies.

wildfunguy
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Post by wildfunguy » Wed Nov 19, 2014 9:34 pm

This is a potentially interesting topic since our mitochondria are non-recombinatory, and our strategies may not be adapted for non-recombinatory evolution. This directly relates to whether our mtDNA should be evolving and not just "stabilizing".

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Post by Darby » Fri Nov 21, 2014 2:04 pm

What "strategies"?

And who is the "we" here - all eukaryotes?

wildfunguy
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Post by wildfunguy » Sat Nov 22, 2014 2:59 am

Darby wrote:What "strategies"?

And who is the "we" here - all eukaryotes?


all organisms that are stuck with their inherited genetics, are exclusively sexual, have long generation times, place large investments in few offspring, and whose success depends on which chromosomes they recombine their chromosomes with (which mtDNA can't do)

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