anisonucleosis

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shefra
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anisonucleosis

Post by shefra » Wed Jan 04, 2006 5:01 am

Can anyone tell me what anisonucleosis means?

sdekivit
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Post by sdekivit » Wed Jan 04, 2006 10:04 am

aniso refers to the microscopic term anistropic. This means that this is a very dark region seen in the microscope (just like pyknosis)

--> think also of A-bands in de skeletal muscle, the dark region of sarcomeres. The A stands also for anisotropic.

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Enzyme
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Post by Enzyme » Wed Jan 04, 2006 5:32 pm

I think that anisonucleosis is more related to nucleous size than to nucleous tinction (how much is the nucleus tinted). It is linked to the variation of nuclear radius. So if we take a look with the microscope, we'll see deformed nucleous (anisonucleosis).

The term that sdekivit defined was hiperchromatism (the nucleous tends to turn very dark due to its big content of DNA).

Another term that we have to take in account is heteropycnosis. This is the visualization of the chromatin tinted/dyed irregularly in the nucleous. So it is the colouration that heterochromatin has respect to the euchromatin.

If heterochromatin appears more dense than euchromatine, it is called positive heteropycnosis. And if heterochromatin appears less dense than euchromatin, it is called negative heteropycnosis.
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sdekivit
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Post by sdekivit » Wed Jan 04, 2006 6:01 pm

Enzyme wrote:I think that anisonucleosis is more related to nucleous size than to nucleous tinction (how much is the nucleus tinted). It is linked to the variation of nuclear radius. So if we take a look with the microscope, we'll see deformed nucleous (anisonucleosis).

The term that sdekivit defined was hiperchromatism (the nucleous tends to turn very dark due to its big content of DNA).

Another term that we have to take in account is heteropycnosis. This is the visualization of the chromatin tinted/dyed irregularly in the nucleous. So it is the colouration that heterochromatin has respect to the euchromatin.

If heterochromatin appears more dense than euchromatine, it is called positive heteropycnosis. And if heterochromatin appears less dense than euchromatin, it is called negative heteropycnosis.


yes, of course :roll:

--> but it's often in combination with hyperchromasia. (reads here that these are checkpoints in determining a pathology)

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Enzyme
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Post by Enzyme » Wed Jan 04, 2006 6:40 pm

Yes, he he :wink:. They are important to locate tumors and to determine many pathologies.
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