WHY INTRONS EXIST?

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jnkdna
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Post by jnkdna » Wed Jan 18, 2006 12:05 pm

@2810712
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Why INTRONS Exist

Post by Jennifer » Thu Jan 19, 2006 1:16 am

Hey,
My biology teacher just had a discussion on this topic:

Some ppl believe that introns exist to allow variation with protein production. For example:

-----INTRON 1------exon-------INTRON 2-----exon

By removing both of the introns (INTRON 1 AND INTRON 2) the template may code for one protein. However, one of the introns may be left in during splicing to code for an entirely different protein. This would make much more sense to the cell becuase it is much more energy efficient, and allows for more variation.

Hope I helped!
~*Jennifer*~

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jnkdna
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Post by jnkdna » Thu Jan 19, 2006 10:41 am

hey that does make a lot af sense! i'll ask my bio teacher at school.
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Post by MrMistery » Thu Jan 19, 2006 8:15 pm

It seems logical, but is it true?
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Post by appleguo » Mon Jan 23, 2006 3:10 pm

actually, i'm curious on how do we actually identify introns and differentiate them from exons.

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Post by MrMistery » Mon Jan 23, 2006 6:23 pm

analise the difference between dna segment and coresponding mRNA probably
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Post by appleguo » Wed Feb 01, 2006 7:49 am

hm.. ok thanks. anyway, scientific america has an article that states that introns might actually be micro DNAs after it is spliced out and directs the expression of exons.

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Post by sachin » Sun Feb 05, 2006 1:25 pm

I Belive INTRONS are those part of genome that get translated condition wise. If you study synthesis of some proteins. you will come to know that non-requires codes at the time are spliced out to get sedire product.

If you consider genes ABCD in which ABD combination gives product X AND combination ACD gives product Y.

Thats happens because at the time of synthesis of product X gene ]C is spiced out and it is treated as Intron.

Some non usefull / Deactivated genes are also present in genome those are spliced out as NO handling mechanism OR target OR initiator is present in body.

All introns are said to be inherited genes which have deactivated as not being used over long time of several generations.

Refer "Gene-VI" and "Gene & evolution" Books.
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Post by 2810712 » Tue Feb 07, 2006 3:32 am

shamim khaja wrote:hi,
I think exons interspersed with introns allows for exon shuffling and the creation of modified genes that might have new adaptive functions.
Most of the non-coding DNA is probably adaptive in that it provides chromosomal regions where recombination between homologous portions of chromosomes can take place without disrupting the function of genes.


This is a point to note that without changing the gene product we can have recombinations... And it can provide variation too.


But it seems very interesting too imagine how this system would have evolved.....





hrushikesh

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