how are genes the unit of replication?

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johnkq
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how are genes the unit of replication?

Post by johnkq » Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:58 pm

Hi, question here, and I hope I phrase this correctly: I understand that genes are the unit of replication in natural selection. But aren't traits ultimately stored in groups of genes? And is it not traits that are selected? So, if it's traits that are selected, how is it that genes are individually replicated?

I hope that's clear, and really hope someone can shed some light on this.

Thanks!

John

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:00 am

1) you can have traits encoded by single gene as well
2) the genes coding for one trait are usually spread around the genome. That'd be it, I guess.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

johnkq
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Post by johnkq » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:25 pm

Thanks, Jack.
So, yes, if it's one gene=one trait, then there is no confusion, but when multiple genes need to be replicated together to pass on a trait, I still don't get how they do that.
Anyone?

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