Stomach Cell Division

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Ultimate_Thylakoid
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Stomach Cell Division

Post by Ultimate_Thylakoid » Wed Dec 07, 2005 3:14 am

I need to know how often stomach cells divide for my High School Biology class. That's pretty much it, and I appreciate any help that anyone can give.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:10 pm

the stomach has 4 tunics. I am guessing you need to know about the division rate of divions of the unistratified cilindric epithelial tissue at the surface. Unfortunately i can not tell it to you exactly, i can only say that it is proportional to that of it's distruction, and, like all epithelial tissue, can divide very fast when in need
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Ultimate_Thylakoid
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Post by Ultimate_Thylakoid » Wed Dec 07, 2005 8:15 pm

Umm...to be honest, I have no clue that even is. Right now in class, we're discussing mitosis/meiosis etc. Everyone was given a part of the body to determine the cell division rate for, and I couldn't think of anything but to ask here. What I'm trying to find out is how often the cells of the entire stomach go through mitosis, not just a single part of it. I can't think of how to be any clearer than that. Thanks for any help.

Also, if anyone knows the chromosome count of anything other organisms, that would be good to know too (it's extra credit).

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Wed Dec 07, 2005 8:17 pm

you can find chromosome count in any genetics book for some organisms, or google if you need for a specific one...
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