banana in refrigerator

Debate and discussion of any biological questions not pertaining to a particular topic.

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Post Reply
pratistha
Garter
Garter
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 1:11 am

banana in refrigerator

Post by pratistha » Sat Nov 26, 2005 2:12 am

hello everybody! :wink:
i was wondering why banana turns black and rots when kept in refrigerator.
thankyou

User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN
Contact:

Post by mith » Sat Nov 26, 2005 6:35 am

oxidation for the blackening. Rots because there's bacteria.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr

User avatar
Navin
Coral
Coral
Posts: 277
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:23 pm
Location: Singapore (Asia Pacific)

Post by Navin » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:34 am

why does oxidation occur faster in fridge than when left outside?
Botany is the study of what? Bottoms!

pratistha
Garter
Garter
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 1:11 am

Post by pratistha » Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:35 am

what is this?no one knows?

User avatar
Navin
Coral
Coral
Posts: 277
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:23 pm
Location: Singapore (Asia Pacific)

Post by Navin » Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:25 am

Navin Posted: Sat Nov 26, 2005 5:34 pm Post subject:

why does oxidation occur faster in fridge than when left outside?


I did some research and got sort of clashing views.

View 1:
You can store bananas in the refrigerator if you want to keep them for a longer time. However, the peel of this tropical fruit will darken. But the banana inside will remain firm and delicious."

View 2:

People think that putting food in the fridge makes it last longer, but that's not always true. Bananas, for example, go black when they are refrigerated. When bananas age naturally their cell walls break down slowly, allowing chemicals to move backwards and forwards. The banana gradually ripens, then finally softens and turns black. Subjecting a banana to temperatures less than 10°C (fridge temperatures are usually less than 4°C) causes the ageing process to take place immediately. The cell walls break down, the chemicals mix and you are left with a black, soft banana. If you put an unpeeled banana into the freezer the cell walls will still break down, but the banana skin will not go black until thawed.

Anyone who knows the truth?
Botany is the study of what? Bottoms!

baikuza
Coral
Coral
Posts: 429
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:09 am
Location: Yogyakarta, indonesia, south-east asia
Contact:

Post by baikuza » Mon Dec 05, 2005 1:28 pm

@prathista
i wondering, did u get any differences on banana where put in out side and refrigerator.

pratistha
Garter
Garter
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 1:11 am

Post by pratistha » Fri Dec 09, 2005 12:00 am

hi navin, :P
that was really interesting.thank you.

pratistha
Garter
Garter
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 1:11 am

Post by pratistha » Fri Dec 09, 2005 12:01 am

@navin
yes i did thats why im asking

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests