ATP

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kassia420
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ATP

Post by kassia420 » Fri Nov 18, 2005 12:21 am

How, specifically, does ATP store energy?

Eminem
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Post by Eminem » Fri Nov 18, 2005 12:57 am

ATP refers to Adenosine triphosphate.

It contains ribose sugar, adenine base, and phosphate group, PO4-2

here is a diagram of its molecular structure

Image

so basically, the phosphate group on the far left breaks off when an enzyme tell it to do so. This reaction releases energy. Its tat simple

After it breaks, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and orthophosphate (HPO4) as the products.

Image

The conversing of ATP to ADP is a cycle, where ADP with energy and that phosphate group can produce ATP.

Therefore, if the phosphate group dont break off, it can store the energy until a enzyme tells it to

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thank.darwin
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Post by thank.darwin » Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:56 pm

It's stored in the high energy bonds between the phosphates; P-P-P
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Terry K.
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Post by Terry K. » Fri Nov 18, 2005 3:27 pm

Yes, there are high energy bonds stored between the phosphates, but the adenosine has something to do with the storage as well, but I don't remember how, the internet should help you out more than I can. Just search for energy storage in ATP and you should get some helpful sites.
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victor
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Post by victor » Sat Nov 19, 2005 12:10 pm

ATP + O2 :arrow: ADP + Pi δH = -7.3 kkal/mole (in vitro)
ATP + O2 :arrow: ADP + Pi δH = -13.3 kkal/mole (in vivo)

Can anyone explain about this? :wink:
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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sat Nov 19, 2005 5:32 pm

Shouldn't the in vitro energy be bigger than in vivo?
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Post by burningredphoenix » Thu Nov 24, 2005 1:08 am

you must understand that it doesn't store energy, it merely releases energy as the bonds are broken

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Post by quasi426 » Sat Nov 26, 2005 10:51 am

victor wrote:ATP + O2 :arrow: ADP + Pi δH = -7.3 kkal/mole (in vitro)
ATP + O2 :arrow: ADP + Pi δH = -13.3 kkal/mole (in vivo)

Can anyone explain about this? :wink:


The concentrations of product and reactant also play a role in the energy released.

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