Transport of carbon dioxide to the lungs

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Iftekhar
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Transport of carbon dioxide to the lungs

Post by Iftekhar » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:52 pm

Could anyone tell me in details(but in a simplified way) how carbon dioxide is transported to the lungs :?: :?: :?:
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Post by victor » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:59 pm

tissue -> capillary vessels -> venula -> vein -> vena cava superior/inferior -> right atrium -> right ventricle -> pulmonary arteries -> lungs' alveoli -> diffusion out to the environment....
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Transport of carbon dioxide to the lungs

Post by Iftekhar » Wed Oct 26, 2005 1:13 pm

Thanks for the reply. But I wanted to know the three ways in which carbon dioxide is transported (by the blood) to the lungs.
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Post by Navin » Wed Oct 26, 2005 1:24 pm

i learnt that carbon dioxide becomes carbonic acid and forms hydrogen carbonate ions in blood (at the venule end of the blood capillary). At the lungs, where the concentration of carbon dioxide is low, the reaction shifts back and carbon dioxide diffuses into the alveoli.

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Post by victor » Wed Oct 26, 2005 1:26 pm

By using the heme substances[in the blood] to bond the CO2 and release it to change it with O2. The releasing process depend on the concentration of O2 inside the body, CO2 inside the body and the concentration of enzyme called carbonate anhidrase.
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Transport of carbon dioxide to the lungs

Post by Iftekhar » Wed Oct 26, 2005 5:12 pm

Thanks very much for the replies. Could you tell me how carbon dioxide is transported in the form of sodium bicarbonate, carbamino-haemoglobine and carbonic acid? :D
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Post by iri_black » Thu Oct 27, 2005 8:06 am

1. Dissolved CO2. CO2 can cross the red cell membrane and dissolve in RBC water.
2. Carbamino compounds. Approximately 30% of RBC contents is hemoglobin. CO2 can form carbamino hemoglobin on amine groups. The H+ released by this reaction is buffered by histidine residues (imidazole group) on the hemoglobin itself.
3. Bicarbonate. Carbonic anhydrase is present in RBCs and catalyze the formation of carbonic acid which dissociated to hydrogen ion and bicarbonate. The H+ is buffered by hemoglobin.
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Transport of carbon dioxide to the lungs

Post by Iftekhar » Thu Oct 27, 2005 3:59 pm

Ok, thanks a bunch for that answer, iri_black. That's just the answer that I wanted. Thanks again.
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Post by rambo » Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:45 am

If this helps I was studying the Krebs cycle and it mentioned how after glycolysis, in an anaerobic respiration process; the broken down pyruvic acid is broken down to co 2 or lactic acid. Following the path of the co 2 it exits the cell then travels through our blood, remember cells are located everywhere so veins are bringing co 2 from all parts of your body. so in this case I'm talking about foot muscle cells. After it enters your heart it is then forced back into the low concentrations of co 2 in the lung, diffusion. It is then ready to be exhaled from the body.

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Post by rambo » Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:47 am

rambo wrote:If this helps I was studying the Krebs cycle and it mentioned how after glycolysis, in an anaerobic respiration process; the broken down pyruvic acid is broken down to co 2 or lactic acid. Following the path of the co 2 it exits the cell then travels through our blood, remember cells are located everywhere so veins are bringing co 2 from all parts of your body. so in this case I'm talking about foot muscle cells. After it enters your heart it is then forced back into the low concentrations of co 2 in the lung, diffusion. It is then ready to be exhaled from the body.

can somebody give some comments back on this reply the path of co 2 was created by me. it is simply a quess.

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Trnasport of carbon dioxide to the lungs

Post by Iftekhar » Fri Oct 28, 2005 9:24 am

Hey rambo! Thanks very much for that extra information. But, what really is this Krebs cycle? You said that after glycosis, pyruvic acid(what is pyruvic acid?) is broken down to CO2 or lactic acid and then CO2 is carried by the blood to the lungs and then diffuses onto areas of lower CO2 concentration. So, is this what is Krebs cycle? Please reply.

And, regarding your CO2 path, I think that your answer is correct because the path which you mentioned is the only simple path for the transport of CO2 to the lungs.
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Post by MrMistery » Fri Oct 28, 2005 6:18 pm

Hi guys. I don't understand exactly what rambo meant but here is what really happens. 2 molecules of pyruvic acid(Ch3COCOOH) results in the anaerboic glycolys of one glucose molecule. From here it is transformed into Acetil~CoA and enters the Krebs cycle. The Krebs cycle, also reffered to as the citric acid cycle, is the sum of reactions from which you get your GTP, NADH and FADH2. This produces CO2 and is followed by oxidative fosforilation, which produces most of the ATP and needs Oxygen. Without oxigen present, pyruvic acid does not enter the cell, it is degraded anaerobicly into lactic acid(CH3CHOHCOOH-hope i got it right). This process does not release CO2
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