Hydrogen Peroxide and Enzymes

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loobyloor2
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Hydrogen Peroxide and Enzymes

Post by loobyloor2 » Mon Oct 24, 2005 12:22 pm

I am currently doing an investigation at school, concerning how the concentration of hydrogen peroxide affects the rate at which it is broken down by the enzyme hydrogen peroxidase. For the peroxidase we are using yeast.
The investigation outline states:
Base your prediction on a scientific reason. Write down any knowledge you can find out, such as earlier work you have done, a preliminary experiment, or in books, computer files, CD-ROM software, etc. If possible try to write your prediction as a mathematical statement

I understand the work on the basis that the higher the concentration the quicker the hydrogen peroxide is going to be broken down by the peroxidase, but are there any scientific rules or laws to prove this?
We had to list the controlled variables and I have put:
Size of the beaker
Temperature of the hydrogen peroxidase concentrations
Type of hydrogen peroxid
Type of enzyme
The volume of the substances
Please could someone check this is right for me?
Thanks

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victor
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Post by victor » Mon Oct 24, 2005 12:33 pm

I don't think that raising up one concentration will speed up the process. Every enzymed reactions have a terminal velocity, means that it reach the maximum velocity to change the:
2H2O2 <=> 2H2O + O2
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hydrogen peroxide and enzymes

Post by loobyloor2 » Mon Oct 24, 2005 12:44 pm

Thanks, but the science teacher has said that it speeds up the process and when we performed the experiment inc lass, the 20% concentration took about 4 seconds whereas the 12% concentration took around 30 seconds.
I don't understand why it happens though

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Post by victor » Mon Oct 24, 2005 12:50 pm

But there's a limit when the process won't speed up again..
Just imagine when all the active site of the enzyme has been taken by all the subtrate (in this case, substrate is much more than enzyme), then there will be some substrate that have to wait for catalytic action performed by enzymes. Even though it happens in a short time.
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Post by Terry K. » Mon Oct 24, 2005 1:48 pm

:lol: to tell you the truth, I'm an 11th grader taking AP Biology(a college level course in the High School) and even I know that reactions speed up with a greater concentration of enzyme and substrate. The reaction rate is dependent upon how much of a substance it has to react with. Plain and simple, it does speed up, and I have never heard of a terminal velocity in reaction rates, unless you're talking about the fastest reactions can occur with a given concentration of enzyme to substrate, because then, well, yes, there is a such thing, but I don't think it's called terminal velocity, that's how fast a given object will fall at its fastest speed possible(i.e. penny off of the Empire State Building, shown on MythBusters)

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peroxide and enzymes

Post by loobyloor2 » Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:23 pm

Ok, what actually happens when the reaction is occuring?

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Post by victor » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:04 pm

Terry K wrote:well, yes, there is a such thing, but I don't think it's called terminal velocity, that's how fast a given object will fall at its fastest speed possible(i.e. penny off of the Empire State Building, shown on MythBusters)


You got it...I named it "terminal velocity" because I took it from Physics book.. :D
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I'm doing this course work too

Post by black_metal_rock_chick » Fri Nov 11, 2005 10:54 am

im doing this too, and im changing concentration of Peroxidase, my results (see attachment) show you what you need to know. :lol:
xXx Becca xXx

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Post by Terry K. » Wed Nov 16, 2005 3:26 pm

sorry to tell you but there is no attachment to the post you made
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