Sodium Potassium pump...

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Ruby
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Sodium Potassium pump...

Post by Ruby » Sat Oct 15, 2005 8:27 pm

Okay, I know how the pump works, but I don't understand why sodium leaves and potassium enters or what would happen without the pump. I know the inside of the cell has a negative charge, but I don't know if that affects anything...So can someone explain please.. Thank you!

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Post by Ruby » Sat Oct 15, 2005 8:47 pm

I just found out that the sodium gives energy to the transporters to import glucose, amino acids, and other nutrients. How does it provide energy?

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Post by sdekivit » Sun Oct 16, 2005 11:14 am

symport of Na-ions and glucose gives energy, because you go with the sodium gradient.

another feature of this pump is to maintain the osmolarity of the inside of the cell.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Oct 16, 2005 4:34 pm

Sodium leaves and potasium enters because Na is in a higher concentration on the outside of the cell and K is no the inside. It wouldn't make any sense to use ATP to move things in the same direction as their concentration gradient, you can do that passively...
Na is used in simport mechanisms to import glucose, aminos etc and in antiport mechanisms, such as the Na/Ca antiporter. This works by the following mechanism: one ion of Na comes in, one ion of Ca goes out.
Hope it's clear now
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Post by Ruby » Mon Oct 17, 2005 5:28 am

Thank you for the help, I finally understand!

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Post by sdekivit » Mon Oct 17, 2005 5:44 pm

MrMistery wrote:Sodium leaves and potasium enters because Na is in a higher concentration on the outside of the cell and K is no the inside. It wouldn't make any sense to use ATP to move things in the same direction as their concentration gradient, you can do that passively...
Na is used in simport mechanisms to import glucose, aminos etc and in antiport mechanisms, such as the Na/Ca antiporter. This works by the following mechanism: one ion of Na comes in, one ion of Ca goes out.
Hope it's clear now


and they al use Na-ions as the driving force :)

however, the Na/K-ATPase uses energy from ATP to transport Na out of the cell and K into the cell and thus against the concentrationgradients.

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