Bone Cells

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

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littlepink08
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Bone Cells

Post by littlepink08 » Sun Oct 09, 2005 8:39 pm

Does anybody know anything about bone cells? :?

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mith
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Post by mith » Mon Oct 10, 2005 1:30 am

what about it? 8)
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littlepink08
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Bone Cells

Post by littlepink08 » Mon Oct 10, 2005 2:20 am

What do they do? :?

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mith
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Post by mith » Mon Oct 10, 2005 3:32 am

make bones?
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pratistha
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bone cells

Post by pratistha » Mon Oct 10, 2005 3:42 am

bone cells are called osteocytes. bone contain matrix calle ossein.matrix layers to form lamella. each lamella has space called lacunae.and each lacunae has one bone cell(osteocyte).i hope it helps. or do u want more? :

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Mon Oct 10, 2005 6:24 pm

I didn't even understand that and i already know about bone cells. :D Sorry, didn't mean to be rude..
Ok, now about those bone cells:
There are 3 types of bone cells:
-osteblasts- young bone cells that secrete oseine
-osteocytes- mature bone cells, are located in some cavities named osteoplasts
-osteoclasts- giant cells, with many nuclei and a very well developed enzymatic system that constantly "eat" from the bone. A colony of osteoclasts forms a channel inside the bone 1 mm in diameter and several mm in lenght, that is then filled up with osteoblasts that secrete oseine and lead to the "finished" product. This happens al your life and there is an equilibrium between the 2 processes: oesteogenesis and ostelysis. As you grow old, osteolysis is predominant, this making it more likely to have fractures.

Have i answered your question?
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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