enzymes

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cl0vergalx
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enzymes

Post by cl0vergalx » Sat Sep 24, 2005 6:56 pm

heys ppl. :D i confused with tis. erms. enzymes denature under some infavourable conditions right? but is the procees revesible or irrevesible? :?:

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Post by MrMistery » Sat Sep 24, 2005 7:06 pm

irreversible
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Post by cl0vergalx » Sat Sep 24, 2005 7:21 pm

thanks! :lol:

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Post by Jelanen » Sun Sep 25, 2005 1:01 am

That is not entirely accurate. If the lowest energy state of the protein is also its functional configuration, then denatureing will only inactivate the protein while it is in the unfavorable condition. If you return the protein to a favorable condition, it will (hopefully) assume the lowest energy state, which in my example, is also its functional state. That being said, 9.99 times out of 10, the denatured protein is trashed. I would avoid absolutes. If I have learned anything from schooling, industry, or life, this is no such thing as absolutes.

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Post by Poison » Sun Sep 25, 2005 5:32 pm

Let's say usually irreversable.
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Sep 25, 2005 5:56 pm

Ok, ok, sorry. Jelanen is right. I try to avoid absolute statements too, but that one slipped :D Usually irreversible...
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Post by victor » Tue Sep 27, 2005 12:09 pm

:D since Einstein's theory come out...absolute can't be maintained..it's relative to each other... :lol:
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Post by Jelanen » Tue Sep 27, 2005 9:03 pm

Einstein said TIME is relative to the observer. Totally off topic, but cool story: When the US developed and implemented GPS satellites, they couldn't get an accurate location determination, they were off by hundreds of meters. Some too-smart-guy decided to add in equations dealing with relativity...DING. Now I can figure out where I am with an EPE of 5m.

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Post by MrMistery » Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:24 pm

Yeah, i read that too. very interesting indeed.
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Post by Fried Zygote Sandwich » Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:45 pm

I'm pretty sure that you can denature an enzyme until a certain point and it will reform the original shape. As long as you don't change the primary (or is it secondary?) structure of an enzyme it reconfigures. I THINK. I'm not certain.

This said, any sort of heating or change in enviroment that breaks the peptide bonds between the amino acids and alters the primary shape will render it no longer reversible.

An example of the reversible denaturing an an enzyme would be pepsin and pepsinogen in the stomach. The enzyme responsible for digestion of proteins inactive in a certain pH, then active when the pH level becomes favorable.

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Post by MrMistery » Thu Sep 29, 2005 6:59 pm

It's secondary and tertiary. And, with a few exceptions, it is irreversible...
jelanen pointed out the exceptions...
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Post by Jelanen » Thu Sep 29, 2005 7:01 pm

No, reread the posts above and you'll see that whether you can regain enzyme activity after denaturization depends on what the active energy state of the enzyme is. If the active conformation is also the lowest energy state, then you have a better chance of regaining activity. The enzyme might also reform into a higher conformational energy state, that is inactive. It would be so much easier if I could draw it for you, much easier to understand that way.

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