Cell Division

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

User avatar
BioGirl
Garter
Garter
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 6:24 pm

Cell Division

Post by BioGirl » Fri Feb 11, 2005 6:39 pm

I've always wondered, what happens to organelles when cells divide? Do parts of the organelles from the old cell go into the new cell, or does the new cell grow its own organelles? That's probably a stupid question, but I'm curious!! :roll:

User avatar
biostudent84
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 974
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 6:00 am
Location: Farmville, VA
Contact:

Post by biostudent84 » Fri Feb 11, 2005 7:11 pm

The old ones remain...some in each new cell created. If there are not enough organelles for both cells, each will produce more so there is a sufficient amount to run the cell.

User avatar
BioGirl
Garter
Garter
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 6:24 pm

Post by BioGirl » Sat Feb 12, 2005 3:38 pm

How stupid is that? They just appear? WHAT IS THAT?

User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Post by Poison » Sat Feb 12, 2005 5:03 pm

I couldnt understand what you are saying? just appear????? they replicate themselves or synthesized before division. not just appear.
Last edited by Poison on Sun Feb 13, 2005 3:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
thank.darwin
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 347
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 7:39 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Post by thank.darwin » Sun Feb 13, 2005 2:45 am

BioGirl wrote:How stupid is that? They just appear? WHAT IS THAT?


Some of the cells organelles can replicate - mitochondria and chloroplasts - biostudent84, can other organelles self replicate before a cell divides?
No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
-Albert Einstein

User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN
Contact:

Post by mith » Mon Feb 14, 2005 8:33 pm

I think they all replicate themselves. If you look at the phases of the cell, you should notice there is a growth stage where the cell grows and a second phase where everything is duplicated in preparation for the big separation.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr

User avatar
thank.darwin
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 347
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 7:39 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Post by thank.darwin » Mon Feb 14, 2005 9:25 pm

I don't think all of them replicate... does anyone?
No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
-Albert Einstein

User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Post by Poison » Mon Feb 14, 2005 9:50 pm

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but as much as I know not all organelles replicate themselves. The ones which have its own genetic material can replicate. For example: mitochondria, chloroplasts, centrioles, ribosomes.
The other ones are sythesized before the division starts. For example; lysosomes.

DevGrp
Death Adder
Death Adder
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: UK

Post by DevGrp » Tue Feb 15, 2005 12:56 pm

Mitochondria and chloroplasts do have their own genomes but these don't code for all the genes required for their own proteins, some of these are still manufactured by the nuclei genome, so they can't completely self replicate.

There is a theory that during the evolution of eukaryotic cells that mitochondria are actually bacteria which became traped inside the cell and algae were the precusors of chloropplasts. This might explain why they have their own DNA. They have obviously heavily evolved since then.

User avatar
thank.darwin
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 347
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 7:39 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Post by thank.darwin » Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:20 pm

DevGrp, correct me if I'm wrong; Mitochondria do self replicate and they do it all the time - not just when the cell is splitting...?
No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
-Albert Einstein

DevGrp
Death Adder
Death Adder
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: UK

Post by DevGrp » Wed Feb 16, 2005 9:28 am

As far as I know they divide all the time, all I was saying is that they require protein from nuclear encoded genes as well as their own genes

User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Post by Poison » Wed Feb 16, 2005 4:40 pm

Thats right DevGrp, mitochondria can divide (if needed) without cell division.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 0 guests