flagella and cilia

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bh
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flagella and cilia

Post by bh » Sun Sep 18, 2005 11:33 pm

can a cell have both flagella and cilia or just one or the other? :?

th1_rhs13
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Post by th1_rhs13 » Mon Sep 19, 2005 12:12 am

For the use of mobililty I can't fathom why a cell would need both cillia along with a flaggela.

I sat in a Micro class the other day, but at the time but was saturated with math homework.

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Post by rosebud » Tue Sep 20, 2005 12:18 pm

Flagella below to prokaryotes while cilia belong to eukaryotes. Both help in the movement of the cell in question.

:wink:
[We moved the topic here as it made more sense. Biology-online.org team]

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:48 pm

Actually no. Both cilia and flagella can be found both in prokaryotic organisms as well as eukaryotic ones.
Ex: Flagella can be found both in euglena viridis and Salmonella tiphi
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victor
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Post by victor » Wed Sep 21, 2005 11:56 am

anyone can explain me about the movement process? I mean how electric wave signals move the flagellum or cillium?
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Post by th1_rhs13 » Sun Oct 02, 2005 5:17 am

To eloborate to speak of now, but I'll try to find this topic at a later time. if that is to long of a wait I suggest Google.

I agree that the division of cell motility is eroneous, I looked at my notes from last year when we in to depth of taxonimy and the motility of cells. Within paramicium putrinum cillia is found and flagella is found in Giardia lamblia which are both Eukaryotes.

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Post by MrMistery » Mon Oct 03, 2005 6:11 pm

@victor
You first need to study the mollecular compenents of the organelles and then wonder how they work. I am sick and to tired to explain now
@th1_rhs13
Just because both of those examples are eukaryotes it doesn't mean you can't find them at prokaryotes...
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victor
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Post by victor » Tue Oct 04, 2005 11:51 am

what I know from flagellum or cillium is their 9+2 microtubules structure... :lol: I haven't study further into it now...I'm dealing with the organic chemistry and virology now...(even though my lecturer angry at me because I never learn biology as like in the curicullum... :D )
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Post by th1_rhs13 » Sun Oct 09, 2005 4:15 am

I'm well aware, I was making the point that regulation of motility appratus -Cillia/flagella- to a certain cell type is flawed, as you can find either in both. I wish i had the time to go into depth, I would have to look for all my notes and sketches from last years courses.

Currently, I'm working on the flagellar re-frowth of chlamydomanas in my Lab experiment. We detatch the flagella and hope to induce re-growth with several variables. I'm tied up right now and dead tired (F/t Bio major&F/t job do not mix) I'll try to get back on this.



MrMistery wrote:@victor
You first need to study the mollecular compenents of the organelles and then wonder how they work. I am sick and to tired to explain now
@th1_rhs13
Just because both of those examples are eukaryotes it doesn't mean you can't find them at prokaryotes...

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movement

Post by pratistha » Mon Oct 10, 2005 3:10 am

well what i know is cilliamove with rowing movement and is found all over the body.flagella moves with wave movement and is usually just two :P

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Post by baikuza » Mon Oct 10, 2005 9:32 am

MrMistery wrote:Actually no. Both cilia and flagella can be found both in prokaryotic organisms as well as eukaryotic ones.
Ex: Flagella can be found both in euglena viridis and Salmonella tiphi


em.. how about some lines in the bacteria surface(at its cell wall-i just look it for a minute)?-the bactery has flagella.
is it can be called as cilia?

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Post by victor » Mon Oct 10, 2005 11:36 am

You mean it's a cillia-like thing on the bacteria's surface? well, it's called pillus (plural = pilli), used as a binding receptor in bacteria to it's host.
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